- The Washington Times - Friday, April 27, 2007

The Washington Times won 13 awards in the 2006 Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association’s 2006 Editorial Contest.

The awards for writing, photography, artwork and design were presented yesterday at the Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City, Md.

“We’re gratified that the contest judges share the opinion of hundreds of thousands of readers that The Times inevitably gets it first, and gets it right,” said Wesley Pruden, editor in chief of The Times. “That’s why newspapers and newspaper Web sites are the places to go for the news. Ours is an intense and dedicated staff, only the best, and it shows.”

Alexander Hunter, assistant art director for The Times Weekend magazine, won first place in art or illustration for daily newspapers with circulations over 75,000 for “Baltimore’s Bad Boy,” with an illustration for a review of a biography of journalist H.L. Mencken. The portrait, which judges said has a very “Mencken-like intensity” that “grabs your eye,” also earned Mr. Hunter one of 39 Best of Show awards.

Times artist Linas Garsys took second place in the same category for an illustration for a review of “Hope and Blues,” a book about the Hope Diamond.

Photographer Allison Shelley won first place in the general news photo category for capturing a pro-life prayer vigil outside the Supreme Court on the eve of the annual March for Life. Judges said the photograph demonstrates “powerful emotion and outstanding composition.”

Mary F. Calvert and Peter Lockley won second-place awards in the feature and sports photo categories, respectively.

Editorial writer Russ McCracken placed second in editorial writing for “Island Separatist,” arguing against a race-based voting process for the trustees of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

S.A. Miller won second place for a political enterprise story on racism in rural Maryland that analysts speculated would cost Michael Steele votes in his campaign for the U.S. Senate. Mr. Steele, who was the lieutenant governor, subsequently lost by a narrow margin.

Jim McElhatton won second place for local-government reporting that uncovered corruption among D.C. Medicaid drivers, including some with criminal records and numerous driving violations.

Patrick Stevens won second place for a sports story on the NCAA men’s basketball championship, which went to the University of Florida.

The Times sports staff also won second place in the special sections category for preview coverage of Opening Day for Major League Baseball and the Washington Nationals.

Gabriella Boston won second place in the environmental reporting category for a piece on horse loggers.

The Times design staff took second place in front-page design, and artist Joe Oliva Ganoza won second place for feature-page design.

The MDDC Press Association was founded in 1908 and includes 164 daily and periodical newspapers.

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