- The Washington Times - Monday, October 1, 2007

Perhaps’?

“In the latest effort to target Rush Limbaugh, the left-leaning group Media Matters has manufactured yet one more false — and by now yet one more tiresome — controversy. …

“What’s missing from the Media Matters account is one important thing: context — and without context, you get a completely false account of what happened. But perhaps that’s the intent. …

“The Left in America clearly wants to take Limbaugh out, and for obvious reasons: he is a deeply influential conservative voice and during the last 20 years he has changed American politics and the American media in profound ways. The Left hates him — but they have found no way to stop him. Like the Mississippi, he just keeps rolling along.”

Peter Wehner, writing on “Phony Controversy,” Friday at NationalReview.com

The ‘racism beat’

“Let’s assume the worst about Jena, La., and the charges of attempted murder brought against five black youths for beating a white student unconscious last December: that the district attorney’s indictments were motivated by rank racism, and that the racial tensions in this town of 3,000 are exclusively the product of white animus against blacks. Does it follow that this latest object of frenzy on the media’s racism beat is emblematic of America’s judicial system or the state of race relations today? …

“That is certainly what the ever-expanding army of racial victimologists and their media enablers would have you believe. … Sen. Christopher Dodd declared that Jena reveals ‘de facto segregation’ — in the spirit of Jim Crow — ‘is still very real’ in many parts of America.”

Heather Mac Donald, writing on “The Jena Dodge,” Sept. 24 at City- Journal.org

Two faces

“After the events of 9/11 … I avidly read any and all posted al Qaeda messages. The group’s motivation seemed clear enough: retaliation. According to its widely disseminated statements, the West in general, and the United States in particular, had been — overtly and covertly — oppressing and exploiting the Islamic world. The accusations included: unqualified U.S. support for Israel at the expense of Palestinians; deaths of Iraqi children due to U.N. sanctions; U.S. support for dictatorial regimes in the Muslim world; and, most recently, Western occupation of Afghanistan and Iraq. Every single message directed to the West by al Qaeda includes most of these core grievances, culminating with the statement that it is the Islamic world’s duty to defend itself. …

“Soon after relocating to Washington in order to attend Georgetown, I landed an internship, which later evolved into a full-time position, at the Near East Section of the African and Middle Eastern Division of the Library of Congress. …

“Numerous Arabic books dealing with al Qaeda passed through my hands. … Surprisingly, I came to discover that most of these had never been translated into English. … They were theological treatises, revolving around what Islam commands Muslims to do vis-a-vis non-Muslims. … There was, in fact, scant mention of the words ‘West,’ ‘U.S.,’ or ‘Israel.’ All of those were encompassed by that one Arabic-Islamic word, ‘kufr’ — ‘infidelity’ — the regrettable state of being non-Muslim that must always be fought through ‘tongue and teeth.’ ”

Raymond Ibrahim, writing on “The Two Faces of Al Qaeda,” in the Sept. 21 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education

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