- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 14, 2009

Bruno’s filth

Sacha Baron Cohen’s new film in which he poses as a gay Austrian fashion reporter is a hit.

“Bruno” brought in $30.4 million over the weekend, to earn the No. 1 spot at the box office, a considerable feat for a film that has been denounced by Christians and gay advocacy groups for its vile jokes and offensive displays of sexuality.

Christian Film & Television Commission founder Ted Baeh has sent letters to local authorities asking them to ban the film, citing a litany of objections to the film’s content.

“This disgusting, abhorrent movie contains (among other things) extremely graphic scenes of heterosexual and homosexual sex acts, explicit scenes and extended close-ups of full male and full female nudity,” said Mr. Baeh, adding that the film includes “obscenely graphic verbal descriptions of perverse sex acts in dialogue and conversations with real people.”

Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation President Jarrett Barrios also was offended by inclusion of a baby in some of the film’s gay jokes, wondering whether it would have impact on advancing gay rights. “The title character shows a talk-show audience photos of sexual activity occurring in the presence of an infant child,” Mr. Barrios said in a statement. “Can this help the gay families across the country who continue to be reduced to political punching bags at the ballot box?”

If that wasn’t enough, the baby, who is black, is named O.J.

Mr. Baeh’s and Mr. Barrios’s complaints seem to be just the beginning. Several film critics have written about their repulsion.

Yet, the film’s shock value is exactly what’s attracting viewers and what’s made Mr. Cohen famous. Before playing Bruno, Mr. Cohen mocked other stereotypes as a white illiterate, named Ali G, who strives to become a rap star and as a Kazakh named Borat in the film “Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan.”

Pharmacists lose

Pro-life groups were dealt a setback by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that Washington state pharmacists must prescribe medication to terminate pregnancy despite religious or moral objections.

The suit was brought on Ralph’s Thriftway and two other pharmacists who sued the state over a 2007 rule requiring all state pharmacies to carry and hand out the morning-after pill. They argued their Christian beliefs prohibited them from dispensing medication to stop pregnancy and won a temporary injunction from the Seattle District Court, but 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals lifted that last week, forcing pharmacists once again to fill prescriptions for the medication.

“Any refusal to dispense - regardless of whether it is motivated by religion, morals, conscience, ethics, discriminatory prejudices, or personal distaste for a patient - violates the rules,” the court said.

Pro-lifers maintain that medical professionals should be able to exercise their “right to conscience,” allowing them to avoid performing medical procedures they oppose on moral grounds. Americans United for Life President and CEO Dr. Charmaine Yoest said: “When a state steps in and forces health care professionals to provide services contrary, to their religious, moral, or ethical beliefs, it is a loss for liberty and undermines the Constitution itself.”

New pill

Those pharmacists will have a new abortion pill to stock, too. The Food and Drug Administration approved another version of the morning-after pill Monday that only requires a single dose to prevent pregnancy instead of two doses.

Plan B One-Step will be available next month for over-the-counter purchase by customers older than 17 and by prescription for girls younger than 17. The initial morning-after pill, required two doses over 12 hours.

• Amanda Carpenter can be reached at [email protected] times.com.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide