- The Washington Times - Tuesday, July 28, 2009

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina man trained in Pakistan and Afghanistan has been charged along with six of his alleged recruits with conspiring to support terrorism and traveling overseas to participate in “violent jihad,” according to an indictment unsealed Monday.

Daniel Patrick Boyd, 39, and the six other men were arrested Monday and made their first appearances in Raleigh, charged with providing material support to terrorism.

“These charges hammer home the point that terrorists and their supporters are not confined to the remote regions of some far away land but can grow and fester right here at home,” U.S. Attorney George E.B. Holding said in a statement. He declined further comment.

The indictment said Boyd, a U.S. citizen, trained in Afghanistan and fought there between 1989 and 1992 against the Soviet Union before returning to the United States. Court documents charged that Boyd, also known as ‘Saifullah,’ encouraged others to engage in jihad.

Two of the suspects are Daniel Patrick Boyd’s sons: Zakariya Boyd, 20 and Dylan Boyd, 22. The others are Anes Subasic, 33; Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, 22; and Ziyad Yaghi, 21.

Hysen Sherifi, 24, a native of Kosovo and a U.S. legal permanent was also charged. in the case. He was the only person arrested who was not a U.S. citizen.

All were residents of North Carolina, but it wasn’t immediately known where they lived. It was not immediately known if they had attorneys. No attorneys for the men were listed in court records.

The indictment claims Boyd traveled to Israel in 2007 with several of the defendants, hoping to engage in “violent jihad.” The attempt was unsuccessful, though, and the men returned home, officials said.

Boyd was also accused of trying to raise money last year to fund others’ travel overseas to fight. One of the men, Hysen Sharifi, allegedly went to Kosovo to engage in violent jihad, according to the indictment, but it’s unclear if he did any actual fighting.

Several of the defendants, including Boyd, were also charged with practicing military tactics on a private property in Caswell County in June and July of this year.


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