- The Washington Times - Monday, April 19, 2010

BERLIN | Hydrogen, one of Earth’s most abundant elements, once was seen as green energy’s answer to the petroleum-driven car: easy to produce, available everywhere and non-polluting when burned.

Hydrogen energy was defeated by a mountain of obstacles - the fear of explosion by the highly flammable gas; the difficulty of carrying the fuel in large, heavy tanks in the vehicle; and the lack of a refueling network. Automakers turned to biofuels, electricity or the gas-electric hybrid.

But hydrogen, it turns out, never was completely out of the race. Now Israeli scientists and entrepreneurs claim to have brought hydrogen energy a step closer by putting it in much smaller, lighter containers.

Rather than using metal or composite cylinders of compressed gas that look like bulky scuba gear, hydrogen is packed into glass filaments that, once out of the lab, will be only slightly thicker than a human hair.

These 370 glass capillaries are bundled into a glass tube called a capillary array, about the width of a drinking straw. The scientists say 11,000 such arrays will fuel a car for 240 miles, take less than half the space and weight of tanks currently installed in the few hydrogen cars now available.

“We have shown new materials that can store more hydrogen than any other system,” says Dan Eliezer, chief scientist of C.En Ltd., the company based in Geneva, where the Israelis are developing their invention.

The scientists make no attempt to improve the standard fuel cell, which is not much different today from when it was invented more than 150 years ago. A fuel cell makes electricity from chemical reactions involving hydrogen and oxygen, producing only water vapor as a byproduct. The fuel cell can be compared with a standard car’s engine, while the capillary arrays would be comparable to the gasoline tank.

The system was unveiled in Berlin at a demonstration for the Associated Press at the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, known as BAM, which has been testing the materials since 2008 and has pronounced the system safe. Also attending was a representative of Italian-based Generali Insurance, which has invested $10 million in the project.

While its backers call the technology a breakthrough, it is unlikely to gain traction without a large injection of capital to scale up development. It also would need a distribution system and the support of major car companies, which have poured billions of dollars into their own closely guarded research programs.

Auto companies “are still investing significant amounts of money in hydrogen and fuel cells” and have hundreds of researchers working on the technology, said David Hart, director of E4tech, a business and energy consultancy in London.

Automakers refuse to disclose details of their research or funding.

Mr. Hart said the glass capillaries appear to be an “interesting” technology that would be “very significant” if it were to provide the energy claimed by the company. But if it means creating a new refueling infrastructure, “it may still not be the right answer for cars,” he said.

Like electric cars, the driving force behind hydrogen research is the need to break away from oil and rein in emissions of greenhouse gases blamed for climate change, especially carbon dioxide from industry and transport. Transportation adds about 13 percent of man-made carbon to the atmosphere.

Hydrogen boasts zero emissions. It can be produced from water through electrolysis, or harvested as the waste product of nuclear reactors and chemical plants.

“In terms of saving carbon dioxide, you do a great deal more with renewable hydrogen,” said Danny Dicks, a biofuels expert from the British consultancy group Innovation Observatory. “So ultimately, hydrogen is where things ought to be driving toward.”

Automakers, for now, still are focused on battery power. At the Geneva Motor Show last month, nearly all major manufacturers displayed their latest electric vehicles or plans to produce them. The few hydrogen vehicles on the floor attracted little attention.

It was not always that way.

President George W. Bush allocated $1.2 billion for hydrogen research and said in his 2003 State of the Union address: “The first car driven by a child born today could be powered by hydrogen and pollution free.” The Obama administration largely scrapped the program.

In Europe, too, hydrogen is low-priority. The Dutch government, for example, recently announced a $6.75 million subsidy for hydrogen, but gave eight times more for electric cars. Buyers of plug-ins get tax breaks and rebates, and cities like London and Amsterdam are planting charge-up pillars on their streets.

“Electricity is taking all the subsidy schemes. It’s taking it away from hydrogen,” said Robert van den Hoed of Ecofys, an independent Dutch consultancy on renewable energy.

The main reason is cost. Electric cars are road-ready and in production, while hydrogen vehicles are still experimental. Nissan’s new electric car, the Leaf, will go on sale for about $25,000 in the United States, including a government rebate.

LOAD COMMENTS ()

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide