- - Sunday, December 28, 2014

2014 turned out to be the year the Republican Party had long waited for. Finally, the GOP took control of the Senate and set a record for the number of seats it controlled in the House of Representatives.

As we all know, it did not take the Republicans long to blow it.

A month after its incredible victory, the GOP squandered its mandate, surrendering to the Democrats. The GOP led House of Representatives did not proclaim its mandate and hold off on major decisions until the Republican majority in the Senate was sworn in. No, they went to the GOP position of preemptive surrender and gave President Obama and the Democrats almost everything they wanted.

Despite the pleas and demands from the base, the GOP did nothing to stop Mr. Obama’s executive amnesty. They even rewarded left wing billionaires who had spent millions to keep the Democrats in power by extending so-called “Green Energy” subsidies.

The architect of the Republican surrender was House Speaker John Boehner.



Mr. Boehner has no love for the tea party. The feeling is mutual.

In 2010, Mr. Boehner loved the tea party. Why not? The previous two elections had looked like Custer’s last stand for the GOP, except that Custer fared better than the Republican Party had.

The Republicans were on the political endangered species list and Mr. Boehner embraced the tea party as his only hope. As soon as he was in office, the tea party was simply a part of the Republican Party to be ignored.

Mr. Boehner made the obligatory statements about cutting spending and reducing Obamacare. Yet time after time, when the occasion called for him to stand and fight, he chose surrender.

2014 is almost over and 2015 is almost here. The first order of business for the House of Representatives in 2015 is to elect a new Speaker of the House.

It cannot be John Boehner.

Mr. Boehner is already lining up the agenda for 2015. It includes amnesty. It includes meaningless votes to block Mr. Obama’s executive amnesty but as with all of those Obamacare repeal votes, nothing will happen.  Mr. Boehner’s agenda includes more crony spending for the chamber of commerce and perhaps the biggest special interest giveaway of all, trying to ram the Trans Pacific Partnership treaty through, via “Fast Track” legislation.

Here is one simple message for the Republicans. The people who put you in office are not the chamber of commerce lobbyists. They are not the special interest cronyist groups that show up, pump your hand and write you a campaign check.

The people who put you in office are the rank and file conservative voter. Many of these people support the tea Pparty movement.

And the people are tired of the Republican games in Washington.

For years, conservatives have talked about taking over the Republican Party. The Republicans give lip service to conservatives then go back to their big spending ways. In fact, it is hard to see much difference between the two parties.

If the Republicans re-elect John Boehner as speaker, it sends a message to the conservative base. It tells members of the tea party that the GOP thinks they should be neither seen nor heard. The GOP thinks they should only show up every two years to help Republican candidates and then let the party bosses decide what is best after that.

No more.

If the GOP re-elects Mr. Boehner, then it is time for a new conservative political party.

Mr. Boehner is the poster child for a Republican Party that believes in government of the special interest, by the special interest and for the special interest.  Mr. Boehner is not interested in what is best for real Americans, only what is best for the lobbyists who come through his door and their clients.

Enough is enough.

This is a line in the sand.

If the Republicans prove once again it will be business as usual, then it is time for conservatives to find a new political home.

Let’s see how well the Republican Party fares without the base that Mr. Boehner and his friends so despise.

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