- Associated Press - Friday, June 13, 2014

Sunday, June 15

On this date in 1869, the Phoenix Post Office was established.

On this date in 1899, John B. “Pie” Allen died in Tucson. Allen was elected to three terms in the Arizona Legislature and served as Territorial Treasurer from 1867 to 1872.

On this date in 1965, James Mitchell Barney, Arizona historian and nephew of Col. James Barney who owned the Silver King Mine, died.

Monday, June 16

On this date in 1888, the entire downtown section of Holbrook was destroyed by a fire that originated in a wool warehouse. The town was quickly rebuilt, however, with even larger and more substantial buildings.

On this date in 1896, the new electric plant at the Yuma Territorial Prison was destroyed by fire.

On this date in 1910, the Tucson Fire Department’s horse drawn wagons raced through city streets at 9 p.m. in response to an alarm. Suddenly a man appeared in the middle of the street waving a red lantern. The drivers veered to one side, and learned later they had barely avoided plunging into a 6-foot ditch which had been dug across the street for a sewer line.

On this date in 1913, the establishment of an aviation school in Phoenix, the first in the Southwest, was announced. The school’s instructor, Jacques Neyvatte, guaranteed to make students expert fliers in six weeks.

On this date in 1988, Gov. Evan Mecham and his brother, Willard, were acquitted of criminal charges of concealing a $350,000 campaign loan. The acquittal came two months after Mecham was removed from office by a State senate conviction in an impeachment trial on charges of obstruction of justice and misuse of state funds.

Tuesday, June 17

On this date in 1913, farmers in the Upper Gila Valley went to the Supreme Court to prevent copper mines from polluting streams in the area. They won their case.

On this date in 1917, the Rev. John H. Clifford in a sermon delivered at the First Baptist Church in Tucson, charged that the Pima County Jail was a “seminary of vice and corruption, a hotbed of brutality, a breeder of disease - in fact, a very inferno of all that is horrible and revolting.”

Wednesday, June 18

On this date in 1868, the Navajos left their exile at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, and began their return journey to Arizona.

On this date in 1879, the first ice plant in Arizona went into production. S.D. Lount established his factory in Phoenix with a five-horsepower engine capable of producing 1,000 pounds of ice per day. He made his deliveries on a homemade wheelbarrow.

On this date in 1882, the Rev. Endicott Peabody held the first service in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, the first Episcopal church in the territory.

On this date in 1913, the temperature hit 100 degrees for the first time that year, marking the latest day to ever hit 100 degrees.

On this date in 1986, a twin-engine aircraft and a helicopter on sightseeing tours of the Grand Canyon collided, killing all 25 people on both aircrafts.

Thursday, June 19

On this date in 1895, J.O. Dunbar, editor of the Phoenix Gazette, who called the Governor, Territorial Secretary, Attorney General and the Marshal, “assassins, looters, hoodoos, patronage peddlers and land grant sharks” was convicted and fined $3,000 for libel by a Tucson court.

On this date in 1915, 70,000 persons witnessed as the battleship Arizona was launched at the New York Navy Yard, celebrating with a bottle of the first water to flow over Roosevelt Dam and champagne.

On this date in 1926, dedication of the Coronado Trail Highway was held at Hannagan Meadows.

On this date in 1927, Richard Van Valkenburgh, friend of the Navajos, died. The Navajo Tribal Council passed a resolution stating: “No other white man has ever worked among us with greater devotion and understanding.”

On this date in 1976, the University of Arizona won its first NCAA Baseball Championship, defeating Eastern Michigan 7-1. Arizona beat Arizona State the previous day 5-1 to reach the finals.

Friday, June 20

On this date in 1906, the Arizona Daily Star reported that a poultice of equal parts gunpowder and mustard mixed in to a paste with the white of an egg would cure rabies if applied to the bite wound.

On this date in 1910, the Phoenix Arizona Republican announced a boom in auto sales as one company sold three machines in a single week.

On this date in 1928, bids for the construction of the second section of the Swift Trail in the Graham Mountains was opened at the Bureau of Public Roads in Phoenix.

On this date in 1993, Michael Jordan played his last basketball game as the Chicago Bulls beat the Phoenix Suns in Game 6 of the NBA Finals to capture their third straight championship at America West Arena in Phoenix.

Saturday, June 21

On this date in 1860, the original Baca Float Grants were made by act of Congress.

On this date in 1867, Pauline Weaver, who had come to Arizona in 1839 and became a guide, scout, trapper and hunter, died at Camp Lincoln at the age of 70.

On this date in 1913, an entire flock of goats drowned in an irrigation ditch in Tucson when they were driven from the Tucson Mountains by thirst and stampeded into the ditch at the smell of water.

On this date in 1922, Arizona’s first licensed broadcasting station, KFAD, went on the air in Phoenix.

On this date in 1936, A.J. Eddy of Yuma developed the first home evaporative cooler.

END ADV


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide