- Associated Press - Wednesday, November 5, 2014

A daily look at late-breaking news, coming events and stories that will be talked about in Pennsylvania on Wednesday:

LONELY AT THE TOP

Republican Gov. Tom Corbett lost his chance at a second term, losing soundly to Democrat Tom Wolf, a York businessman and former state revenue secretary. Corbett’s loss was one of the few for Republicans, who increased their control of both houses of the state Legislature.

FAMOUS PATHOLOGIST CYRIL WECHT SET TO TESTIFY IN CYANIDE POISONING TRIAL

As a former Allegheny County coroner, Wecht (WEKT) has helped prosecutors put people accused of homicide behind bars. But on Wednesday he’ll be testifying for the defense in hopes of helping Dr. Robert Ferrante, a University of Pittsburgh medical researcher, avoid conviction on a charge of fatally poisoning his wife last year.



PHILADELPHIA POLICE SEEKING VIDEO-RECORDED ABDUCTION SUSPECT

Police say the unknown suspect has used the abducted woman’s bank card and has been seen on surveillance video walking through a convenience store in Maryland, where the woman used to live. Police say the man abducted Carlesha Freeland-Gaither, a 22-year-old nursing assistant, on Sunday night.

STATE POLICE SAY TROOPER’S ALLEGED ASSASSIN USED LAPTOP DURING 48-DAY MANHUNT

State police found the laptop and two storage drives inside an abandoned airplane hangar near the spot where Eric Frein was captured Thursday night. But police aren’t sure how Frein managed to charge the computer’s battery while he used unprotected Wi-Fi hotspots to connect to the Internet as he eluded police seeking him in the fatal shooting of a trooper and the wounding of another in the Poconos in September.

SORRY SEEMS TO BE THE HARDEST WORD

A western Pennsylvania judge has rejected apology letters written by former state Supreme Court justice Joan Orie Melvin and ordered her back on house arrest. Allegheny County Judge Lester Nauhaus wants Melvin to revise a proposed form letter apology and, instead, write personalized letters to each judge in the state apologizing for her campaign corruption conviction last year.

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