- Associated Press - Tuesday, September 2, 2014

LAS VEGAS (AP) - Nevada university regents are asking the state for $1.5 million to fill half of a projected $3 million budget deficit at the William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

The dean of the school, Daniel Hamilton, told the Board of Regents that cost-cutting, private donations and programs such as an international recruitment push could help make up the other half of the shortfall, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported.

Administrators are blaming the shortfall on an enrollment decrease at law schools around the nation. At Boyd, the drop has been more than 20 percent - from about 150 students per year to about 115.

Tuition hikes of 4 percent are planned in each of the next two academic years, and Hamilton said the school has implemented a hiring freeze. Administrators also are considering planned phased-out retirements and possible voluntary buyouts for faculty.

University of Nevada Chancellor Dan Klaich told colleagues who approved the funding request Aug. 22 that it could be catastrophic to fail to help the law school weather the national enrollment drop.

UNLV Acting President Don Snyder said afterward that he was grateful the regents supported the funding request.

It still needs approval from a state Legislature that is also expected to consider several other higher education projects, including a medical school for UNLV.

Boyd opened in 1998, and was ranked 68th among 194 law schools nationally in 2013 by U.S. News and World Report. It ranked 83rd in 2014.

Boyd also is looking to add a new master’s degree program in gambling law and regulation, and more educational opportunities for business professionals, the Review-Journal reported (https://bit.ly/1vIU2Fg).

Regents are due to vote Friday on the master’s program, which would be the first in the nation.

Hamilton said it would let Boyd would target Macau and Singapore for international students.

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Information from: Las Vegas Review-Journal, https://www.lvrj.com


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