- Associated Press - Thursday, August 20, 2015

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) - The latest on the trial of a white North Carolina police officer charged with voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of an unarmed black man seeking help after a September 2013 car crash (all times local):

5 p.m.

The jury in the trial of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police accused in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has adjourned after failing to reach a verdict for the third day.

The jury never entered the courtroom Thursday and Judge Richard C. Ervin sent them home shortly before 5 p.m. Deliberations are scheduled to resume on Friday at 9:30 a.m.

Earlier, the jury asked for five pieces of evidence, adding to the eight they had requested on Wednesday. Judge Richard C. Ervin said they could look at diagrams of the crime scene evidence and pictures of injuries suffered by Officer Randall Kerrick, who is charged with voluntary manslaughter in the death of Jonathan Ferrell nearly two years ago.

Ervin said the racially diverse jury of eight women and four men would have to rely on recollection to determine whether Ferrell was right-handed or left-handed, and recall what Kerrick revealed in testimony about an essay he wrote as part of his application to the police academy.

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10:45 a.m.

The jury in the trial of a white Charlotte-Mecklenburg police officer accused in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man is asking for additional material, but the judge says the jurors may need to rely on memory to help with part of their request.

Judge Richard C. Ervin said Thursday that the jury wanted five items, including photos of Officer Randall Kerrick’s injuries, evidence from the crime scene and the transcripts of one witness’ testimony.

Jurors also wanted to know if Jonathan Ferrell, who was shot and killed by Kerrick, was left-handed or right-handed.

Ervin told jurors they could see the photos and would receive diagrams from the crime scene. But Ervin told the jury it would have to rely on recall as to which hand was Ferrell’s dominant one.

The jury also wanted a copy of an essay Kerrick wrote when he applied to the police academy, but since it was never introduced as evidence, Ervin said jurors would have to rely on testimony about it.

The transcripts being sought weren’t available because the court reporter who took them wasn’t in court Thursday.

The racially diverse jury of eight women and four men is in its third day of deliberations.


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