- The Washington Times - Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Young white men are the most derided group in Britain, a new study has found.

Pollsters at the U.K.-based market research firm YouGov explored the attitudes of 48 different groups. People were asked to judge groups of differing ages, genders and ethnicities, based on specific positive and negative criteria, The Telegraph reported.

Questions included how likely people belonging to that group are to be honest, intelligent, hard working, polite, or benevolent, as well as how likely they are to travel without buying a ticket, become violent, to take drugs, to have many sexual encounters, or to get drunk.

The most praised demographic was white women in their 60s, closely followed by white men in their 60s.

The least praised group was white men in their 20s, falling far behind the next least-praised group, black Caribbean men in their 20s.



“When we look at individual characteristics, white men in their 20s have the worst reputation, out of all 48 groups, for drunkenness, sleeping around, hard work and politeness. They also have the joint worst score, with young black Caribbean men, for a belief that they are prone to drug-taking,” YouGov President Peter Kellner wrote in an article explaining the findings.

YouGov found that gender played a huge role — the most derided groups were mainly men, with the exception of white women in their 20s.

“As with all our other findings, we should stress that these are perceptions,” Mr. Kellner notes. “Whether they reflect the objective truth is a matter for debate.”

“Whether our views flow from prejudice, the way Britain has changed in recent years or bitter personal experience, many of us judge people by their demographic group. When we encounter a stranger, our initial view will often depend on their age, gender and ethnic group. This is clear from YouGov’s latest surveys for Prospect. It is also clear that these judgements are seldom racist in the traditional sense,” the study said.

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