- Associated Press - Thursday, February 19, 2015

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Developments at the Wyoming Legislature on Thurs., Feb 19, the 26th day of the 2015 General Session:

BUDGET BILL: Both the House and the Senate read through scores of amendments to the supplemental appropriations bill. The bill calls for intercepting nearly $200 million that had been on track for deposits into the state’s Rainy Day Fund to cover a revenue shortfall caused by recent lower energy revenues. The bill also calls for budgeting some funds from returns on state investments that haven’t been booked yet. A conference committee will meet later to reconcile differences between the two bills.

PIPELINES: Gov. Matt Mead signed into law a bill that specifies that the owner of surface real estate isn’t responsible if a pipeline running over or across their land breaks and causes pollution, provided that the owner wasn’t responsible for the installation, operation and maintenance of the pipeline.

SEXUAL ASSAULT: The Senate for the second time voted to approve a bill that would allow victims of sexual assault to seek a court protection orders against their assailants. The bill already has passed the Senate.

URANIUM: The Senate for the second time voted to approve a bill that seeks to have the state take over regulation of source materials from uranium milling and mining from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

PAC FUNDING: The Senate placed on the general file a bill that would remove limits on PAC contributions to political campaigns. The bill already has cleared the House.

CAMPAIGN FUNDING: The Senate placed on the general file a bill that would repeal limits on campaign contributions. The bill already has cleared the House.

DISABILITY PLACARDS: The Senate placed on the general file a bill that would allow advanced practice registry nurses to certify disabilities in people seeking placards for vehicles. The bill already has passed in the House.

EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION: The House for the second time voted to approve a bill that would rewrite state law to do away with language specifying that the governor may appoint a director to run the state education department. The Wyoming Supreme Court has ruled that a past law that sought to strip management of the department from the elected state superintendent of public instruction was unconstitutional. The bill already has passed in the House.


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