- Associated Press - Friday, January 30, 2015

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Developments at the Wyoming Legislature on Fri., Jan. 30, the 14th day of the 2015 General Session:

URANIUM: The House for the third time voted to approve a bill that would authorize the governor to begin negotiations with the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission seeking an agreement for the state to assume regulation of certain materials from uranium mining and milling operations.

HEMP: The House gave preliminary approval to a bill that would allow the use of hemp extract under medical supervision.

NURSING: The House gave preliminary approval to a bill that would amend requirements for loans for master’s level and doctorate level education loans.

PENSIONS: The House for the second time voted to approve a bill act that would create a pension account for volunteer firefighters and emergency medical technicians.

RELIGION: The House for the second time voted to approve a bill that sponsors say would limit governmental actions that burden religious freedom.

RELIGION: The House for the second time voted to approve a bill that would prohibit public school districts from discriminating against students or parents on the basis of a religious viewpoint or expression.

GUN ZONES: The House for the second time voted to approve a bill that would remove restrictions against people licensed to carry concealed guns from carrying them on school grounds and in some public buildings.

TRIBAL PLATES: The House voted for the third time to approve a bill that would authorize special license plates for enrolled members of the Northern Arapaho and Eastern Shoshone tribes. The bill now goes to the Senate.

OSHA PENALTIES: A bill was introduced in the House providing that state OSHA penalties may be more stringent than federal penalties.

PAYMENT FOR EXONERATED INMATES: A bill was introduced in the House that would allow state payment to people who have been convicted of crimes and later have been exonerated by DNA evidence. The bill would allow for payment of $100 a day for time spent incarcerated in prison, up to a maximum of $500,000.


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