- Associated Press - Tuesday, July 21, 2015

CHICAGO (AP) - The latest on a federal appeals court ruling that overturned some of the corruption convictions of imprisoned former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich (all times CDT):

5:45 p.m.

Rod Blagojevich’s wife says the family is disappointed in a court ruling that dismissed only some of his corruption convictions.

But Patti Blagojevich said Tuesday that her husband is still hopeful that “justice will prevail eventually.”

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago ruled prosecutors did not prove the Democratic former Illinois governor broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

The court dismissed five of 18 counts against Blagojevich and sent the case back for resentencing.

U.S. District Judge James Zagel could re-impose the original 14-year sentence.

Patti Blagojevich says her husband’s imprisonment has been hard on her family. The couple’s 18-year-old daughter began to cry as her mother mentioned milestones that Rod Blagojevich had missed, including high school graduation.

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5:30 p.m.

An attorney for Rod Blagojevich says he’s disappointed in an appellate court ruling that threw out some but not all of the corruption counts against the imprisoned former Illinois governor.

Leonard Goodman says said the case is “all about politics” and he plans to advise Blagojevich to keep fighting.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday dismissed five of the 18 counts Blagojevich was convicted of. They said prosecutors didn’t prove the Democrat broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

But they also said he did violate the law by trying to trade the seat for campaign cash. Goodman says the governor’s actions were legal.

Goodman says he hasn’t spoken with the imprisoned former governor.

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5:15 p.m.

A former federal prosecutor says there’s a 50/50 chance that a judge reduces the prison sentence of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich for corruption convictions.

Jeff Cramer is a former U.S. attorney in Chicago. He says whether U.S. District Judge James Zagel reduces the 14-year sentence depends on how much weight he gave to the counts that were thrown out.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday ruled prosecutors did not prove the Democrat broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

Cramer says he could see Zagel lowering the sentence slightly, but he doesn’t have to.

The judges said the sentence was not unreasonable even with the tossed convictions.

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4 p.m.

Prosecutors won’t say what their plans are after an appeals court overturned some corruption convictions against former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich.

Joe Fitzpatrick, spokesman for U.S. Attorney Zachary Fardon, said the prosecutor’s office has received the ruling, but he declined to discuss it.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday ruled prosecutors did not prove the Democrat broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

The court dismissed five of the 18 counts Blagojevich was convicted of.

The ruling means the 58-year-old could serve less than his original 14-year sentence, although the court did say the sentence was not necessarily too high.

Prosecutors could appeal the ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court or could choose to retry Blagojevich on the dropped counts.

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3:15 p.m.

Rod Blagojevich’s brother says he’s hopeful after an appeals court overturned some corruption convictions against the former Illinois governor.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday ruled prosecutors did not prove the Democrat broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett to Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

Robert Blagojevich has said his brother’s 14-year sentence was unfair. He tells The Associated Press his brother was a victim of a partial system. He hopes Tuesday’s decision brings some “semblance of justice.”

The Tennessee businessman released a book this year about the case.

He agreed to work as chief fundraiser for his brother in 2008. Agents arrested his brother later that year. Charges against Robert Blagojevich were dropped after jurors deadlocked, but he says it cost him his reputation and nearly $1 million in legal bills.

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3 p.m.

A federal appeals court has ordered that former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich be resentenced as part of a ruling that overturned some of his corruption convictions.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago on Tuesday ruled prosecutors did not prove the Democrat broke the law when he tried to get a Cabinet position in President Barack Obama’s administration in exchange for appointing a top Obama adviser to Obama’s old Senate seat.

The court dismissed five of the 18 counts Blagojevich was convicted of.

The ruling means the 58-year-old could serve less than his original 14-year sentence, although the court did say the sentence was not necessarily too high.

Prosecutors could appeal the ruling or could choose to retry Blagojevich on the dropped counts, though prosecutors often decline to retry a case if most of the counts are upheld.

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2:20 p.m.

An appeals court has tossed out some of imprisoned ex-Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s convictions that he sought to sell or trade President Barack Obama’s old U.S. Senate seat.

The 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago released the dramatic ruling Tuesday.

It wasn’t immediately clear whether the decision means the Democrat faced will serve less than the 14 years he was sentenced to in 2011.

Jurors convicted the 58-year-old of 18 corruption counts over two trials. Most related to charges he tried to swap an appointment to Obama’s vacated seat for campaign money or a job.

The court upheld some of those counts and others linked to separate play-to-pay schemes.

During arguments over Blagojevich’s appeal, the court focused on where the line was between legal and illegal political horse-trading.

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