- Associated Press - Monday, July 6, 2015

APNewsBreak: Cosby admitted in 2005 to getting Quaaludes to give to women he sought sex with

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Bill Cosby testified in 2005 that he got Quaaludes with the intent of giving them to young women he wanted to have sex with, and he admitted giving the sedative to at least one woman and “other people,” according to documents obtained Monday by The Associated Press.

The AP had gone to court to compel the release of the documents; Cosby’s lawyers had objected on the grounds that it would embarrass their client.

The 77-year-old comedian was testifying under oath in a lawsuit filed by a former Temple University employee. He testified he gave her three half-pills of Benadryl.

Cosby settled that sexual-abuse lawsuit for undisclosed terms in 2006. His lawyers in the Philadelphia case did not immediately return phone calls Monday.



Cosby has been accused by more than two dozen women of sexual misconduct, including allegations by many that he drugged and raped them in incidents dating back more than four decades. Cosby, 77, has never been criminally charged, and most of the accusations are barred by statutes of limitations.

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After referendum win, Greece’s leaders under pressure to restart talks with creditors

ATHENS, Greece (AP) - Despite triumphing in a popular vote against austerity, Greece’s leaders Monday faced the urgent need to heal ties with European creditors and reach a financial rescue deal to prevent it from falling out of the euro - possibly within days.

“Time is of the essence,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said after discussing the Greek crisis with French President Francois Hollande in Paris. “(Greek) proposals have to be on the table this week.”

Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras won big in Sunday’s referendum, with 61 percent of voters rejecting the economic measures creditors had proposed in exchange for loans Greece needs to remain afloat. He also received the rare backing of opposition parties to restart bailout negotiations.

But his bolstered mandate to push for better concessions from creditors hit the hard reality of the country’s deteriorating finances, with banks facing the risk of collapse within days unless a rescue deal is reached.

Hours after revelers left Athens’ main Syntagma Square to celebrate the “no” victory, pensioners crowded outside nearby banks to collect emergency payments, markets worldwide were rocked by the result, and European lenders warned that Greece faced a strict deadlines to avoid disaster.

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How close is Greece to leaving the euro? A look at the country’s options and what happens next

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) - Greece is at the last chance saloon, thirsty and out of credit. Next stop could be the badlands of euro exit.

Without a deal on more bailout loans, the heavily indebted country faces looming financial hurdles in the coming days.

If it stumbles, it could leave the shared currency in a chaotic mess. A resounding “no” vote in a referendum Sunday on the tough conditions attached to more loans leaves Athens at odds with its main creditors - the other eurozone governments, led by Germany.

“Greece is in limbo and is sliding fast toward Grexit,” said Berenberg Bank economist Holger Schmieding, using the shorthand for Greek exit.

Here are questions and answers on what Greece faces next.

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SC Senate votes to remove Confederate flag from Statehouse grounds; House OK still needed

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - The South Carolina Senate voted Monday to pull the Confederate flag off the Capitol grounds, clearing the way for a historic measure that could remove the banner more than five decades after it was first flown above the Statehouse to protest integration.

A second vote will be needed Tuesday to send the proposal to the House, where it faces a less certain future. But Monday’s 37-3 vote was well over the two-thirds majority needed to advance the bill.

If the House passes the same measure, the flag and flagpole could be removed as soon as Gov. Nikki Haley signs the papers. The flag would be lowered for the last time and shipped off to the state’s Confederate Relic Room, near where the last Confederate flag to fly over the Statehouse dome is stored.

The vote came at the end of a day of debate in which several white senators said they had come to understand why their black colleagues felt the flag no longer represented the valor of Southern soldiers but the racism that led the South to separate from the United States more than 150 years ago.

As the senators spoke, the desk of their slain colleague, Clementa Pinckney, was still draped in black cloth. Pinckney and eight other black people were fatally shot June 17 during Bible study at a historic African-American church in Charleston. Authorities have charged a gunman who posed for pictures with the rebel banner. Police say he was driven by racial hatred.

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The Latest: In Ecuador, Pope Francis meets with Jesuit priest he hadn’t seen in 30 years

QUITO, Ecuador (AP) - Here are the latest developments from Pope Francis’ trip to South America:

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4:30 p.m.

Before Monday, it had been 30 years since the Rev. Francisco Cortes last saw Pope Francis, who then was simply the Rev. Jorge Mario Bergoglio and was in charge of the Jesuit order in Argentina.

The now nearly 91-year-old Cortes must have made a strong impression with his work at the Colegio Javier parochial school mentoring young men sent to him by the future pontiff. His meeting with Francis on Monday was the only private one-on-one session that the pope scheduled for his visit to Ecuador.

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Iran now pressing for an end to U.N. arms embargo in nuclear deal; U.S. is opposed

VIENNA (AP) - As negotiators braced for yet another possible extension of nuclear talks, Iran demanded on Monday that any deal should include the end to a U.N. arms embargo as well - a condition backed by Russia but opposed by the United States as it seeks to limit Tehran’s Mideast influence.

Late last month, Iran and six world powers gave themselves an extra week past June 30 after it became clear that that original deadline could not be met. The sides now are trying to work out a deal that would limit Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for the easing of tens of billions of dollars in economic penalties on the Islamic Republic.

But disagreements persisted as the sides moved close to the new Tuesday deadline, and White House spokesman Josh Earnest said another extension was “certainly possible.”

Negotiators had previously mentioned the mechanics of curbing Iran’s nuclear programs and the time and pacing of economic sanctions relief as the most contentious problems. But an Iranian official - briefing reporters on condition of anonymity - said Monday that ending the arms embargo was an important part of the deal.

The Iranian decision to publicly bring that issue into the mix suggested that disputes ran deeper than just over the most widely aired issues.

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San Francisco’s ‘sanctuary’ policies criticized after slaying; suspect was in US illegally

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - The killing of a woman at a sightseeing pier has brought criticism down on this liberal city because the Mexican man under arrest was in the U.S. illegally, had been deported five times and was out on the streets after San Francisco officials disregarded a request from immigration authorities to keep him locked up.

San Francisco is one of dozens of cities and counties across the country that do not fully cooperate with federal immigration authorities. The city goes so far as to promote itself as a “sanctuary” for people in the country illegally.

In a jailhouse interview with a TV station, Francisco Sanchez, the 45-year-old repeat drug offender arrested in the shooting Wednesday of Kathryn Steinle, appeared to confirm that he came to the city because of its status as a sanctuary.

The case has prompted a flurry of criticism from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency, politicians and commenters on social media, all of whom portrayed the slaying as a preventable tragedy.

“Most of the blame should fall squarely on the shoulders of the San Francisco sheriff, because his department had custody of him and made the choice to let him go without notifying ICE,” said Jessica Vaughan, director of policy studies at the Washington-based Center for Immigration Studies, which wants tougher immigration enforcement.

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Even a killer has loved ones: Colorado theater shooter’s parents endure trial’s gory details

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) - They show up in court every day, a visible reminder to jurors that even a killer has parents who love him and don’t want him to die.

But more than two months into his mass-murder trial, James Holmes has rarely turned around in his seat to acknowledge them.

They called him Jimbo. He called them Goober and Bobbo. But the relationship Arlene and Robert Holmes had with their son had been strained since he was a young boy. After he left for graduate school, their communication was mostly confined to terse emails.

Holmes told a psychiatrist years after his gunshots killed 12 people and injured 70 in a crowded Colorado movie theater that he doesn’t like to talk with people - even his mother and father.

Holmes’ remoteness from his parents cuts to the heart of his insanity defense.

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Extremist attacks on mosques, church, restaurant across Nigeria leave more than 60 people dead

JOS, Nigeria (AP) - A day of extremist violence against both Muslims and Christians in Nigeria killed more than 60 people, including worshippers in a mosque who came to hear a cleric known for preaching peaceful coexistence of all faiths.

Militants from Boko Haram were blamed for the bombings Sunday night at a crowded mosque and a posh Muslim restaurant in the central city of Jos; a suicide bombing earlier at an evangelical Christian church in the northeastern city of Potiskum, and attacks in several northeastern villages where dozens of churches and about 300 homes were torched.

President Muhammadu Buhari condemned the attacks and said the government will defend Nigerians’ right to worship freely.

It was the latest spasm of violence by Boko Haram extremists who have killed about 300 people in the past week - apparently after an order by the self-proclaimed Islamic State group for more mayhem during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Earlier this year, Boko Haram became an affiliate of the Islamic State group.

The deadliest attack came on Wednesday when more than 140 people were killed - mostly men and boys mowed down by gunfire as they prayed in mosques in the northeastern town of Kukawa.

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Atlantic City bets big on non-gambling attractions to halt decline, and it’s starting to work

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) - Atlantic City’s efforts to recapture some of the tourism dollars it has lost to casino competition in recent years finally appear to be working.

Nine years ago, the city’s casinos started realizing they needed to offer more than just gambling if they still wanted visitors. They doubled down on expensive investments like additional hotel towers, restaurants, swimming pools, spas, shopping, nightclubs and concert venues.

Now, cash sales at non-gambling outlets within casinos represent 28.5 percent of revenue, up from 22.3 percent two years ago, and bars have increased their payrolls by nearly 39 percent in the past two years, according to a recent study conducted by the consulting firm Tourism Economics and commissioned by the Atlantic City Alliance, which promotes the resort to other parts of the country. The study didn’t address profits, but many casinos have reported upturns in profits after adding extras.

“I’m not really a gambler,” said Brandon Ferguson, of Oaklyn, New Jersey. “I don’t like to give my money away; I like it to work for me. I like to chill on the beach, enjoy some good food, do some sightseeing and people-watching.”

He was one of many who turned out in late June for the opening of The Playground, developer Bart Blatstein’s $52 million remake of the former Pier Shops complex into a music-themed entertainment facility. Its main attraction is T Street, a row of music-themed bars and performance venues meant to evoke Nashville’s Music Row: a honky tonk here, a retro ‘80s bar there, an outdoor beer garden, and of course, an Irish pub. A large concert space at the end of the pier can hold 2,000 fans, as well as meetings or even a wedding. Coming soon: a bowling alley and a sports bar designed for fantasy sports aficionados.

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