- Associated Press - Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Sunday, March 29

On this date in 1885, Geronimo and 20 of his warriors who had surrendered to Gen. George Crook returned to the warpath after escaping from U.S. troops.

On this date in 1902, reports began circulating of a rich gold strike in the Guijas district, not far from Arivaca.

Monday, March 30

On this date in 1890, fire destroyed an entire business block in Flagstaff.

On this date in 1921, engineers reported that the Lyman Dam on the Little Colorado River was sinking into the mud, even as construction was under way.

Tuesday, March 31

On this date in 1877, an epidemic of scarlet fever was reported in Prescott following the deaths of three children.

On this date in 1997, the University of Arizona men’s basketball team wins the state’s first NCAA basketball championship.

On this date in 2014, Charles H. Keating Jr., the notorious financier who served prison time and was disgraced for his role in the costliest savings and loan failure of the 1980s, dies at the age of 90.

Wednesday, April 1

On this date in 1861, the Overland Mail Company discontinued its route through Arizona because the Civil War forced troop withdrawals and the closing of forts in Arizona, leaving no protection from Apache Indians.

On this date in 1919, a troop train carrying discharged soldiers from Nogales to Tucson was rerouted after military authorities learned that professional gamblers had gathered in Tucson, hoping to relieve the soldiers of their back pay.

On this date in 1927, 5,000 Salt River Valley residents helped the city of Glendale celebrate the inauguration of its street lighting system.

On this date in 1931, the Canyon de Chelly National Monument was established.

On this date in 1952, construction of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum began.

Thursday, April 2

On this date in 1819, Mormon missionary Jacob Hamblin, who was also in charge of colonization along the Little Colorado River and served as guide to Maj. John Wesley Powell over the Lee’s Ferry route, was born in Ohio.

On this date in 1919, at 10 a.m., the first car ever to climb Sentinel Peak in Tucson, started its trek upward. The car sustained one blown tire. The headlights were left on to prove the feat to residents, and the car was parked on the peak for two days so people could climb up and see it for themselves.

On this date in 1927, Cochise and Graham County cattlemen ordered their crews to ride armed and to shoot when necessary to prevent rustling.

On this date in 1933, Gov. Benjamin B. Moeur unveiled a monument on the Arizona-New Mexico state line dedicating the Geronimo Trail from Douglas to Cloverdale, N.M.

Friday, April 3

On this date in 1904, a leaking gas main exploded in a Prescott saloon and gambling house, injuring four people.

On this date in 1919, Maricopa County, not including the city of Phoenix, stood alone in the rejection of Daylight Savings Time. Other cities and counties gave up the battle and moved their clocks forward an hour, but Maricopa County supervisors insisted there would be no surrender.

On this date in 1927, the Horse Mesa Dam and Power Plant went into operation and began earning $3,200 a day for the Salt River Valley Users Association.

Saturday, April 4

On this date in 1825, Charles T. Hayden, founder of Tempe and father of Sen. Carl T. Hayden, was born.

On this date in 1917, fire caused by a kerosene lamp destroyed all but two buildings in the mining town of Ajo. Citizens saved a phonograph from a burning store and played “There’ll Be a Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight” as the city burned.

On this date in 1930, the Arizona State School for the Deaf and Blind was closed for lack of funds. The school’s teachers were owed three months’ back pay.

On this date in 1988, Gov. Evan Mecham became the first governor in Arizona history to be removed from office through impeachment. Mecham was convicted by the state Senate of obstruction of justice and misuse of state funds.

On this date in 1988, Rose Mofford became Arizona’s first woman governor following the impeachment conviction of Gov. Evan Mecham.

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