- Associated Press - Thursday, March 5, 2015

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) - Sick of the cold yet? Here’s why. The temperature stayed at or below freezing for 43 consecutive days up until Wednesday in parts of Vermont, making the February freeze both long and deep.

It was the second longest streak of at or below-freezing days for Montpelier and St. Johnsbury, on top of a record cold in parts of the state. Both Montpelier and Rutland recorded their coldest Februaries ever.

Montpelier endured a chilly average temperature of 5.1 degrees in February, compared to the normal average of 19.9 degrees. Rutland had an even bigger gap - an average of 5.2 degrees when it’s typically 20.7 degrees in February.

In Burlington, where the weather records go back to 1884, it was the third-coldest February with an average temperature of 7.6 degrees compared to the typical average of 20.7 degrees.

Not only was it the coldest February for some spots but it was the coldest all-time month on record in Rutland, where records date back to 1916, and the second-coldest month ever in Montpelier, which started keeping records in 1948.

That cold streak broke Wednesday, when temperatures hit 37 in Montpelier and 43 in St. Johnsbury.

The bitter cold has led to breaks in water lines causing headaches around the state. Lake Champlain also froze over again this year, the first time it’s done that in two consecutive years in a decade.

But the National Weather Service says spring is on the way with more seasonal temperatures - in the 20s and 30s - in the forecast for the weekend and next week.

Normal for early March is in the mid-30s. Friday was forecast to be below normal.

“We’re kind of getting into your normal kind of spring conditions where it’s going to be warm and then it’s going to be cold, it’s going to be warm then cold,” said meteorologist Conor Lahiff.

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