- Associated Press - Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Sunday, Sept. 6

On this date in 1891, the city of Tucson sprinkled 17,000 gallons of water daily on downtown streets to settle the dust.

On this date in 1898, a tornado unroofed several homes in Casa Grande, causing one death.

On this date in 1911, a fire destroyed one wing of the state asylum in Phoenix. The militia was called out to evacuate and guard 160 patients.

On this date in 1911, the Inspector of Weights and Measures found that 30 out of 33 scales in Tucson were giving short weight.

On this date in 1932, the Northern Arizona State Teachers College in Flagstaff decided to accept hay, potatoes, eggs, oats or anything else man could eat in lieu of cash from students for room and board and books.

On this date in 2006, Phoenix police arrested construction worker Mark Goudeau in the sexual assault of two sisters. The arrest led to Goudeau being charged in the killing of nine people in the so-called Baseline Killer case that terrorized the Phoenix area during the summer.

Monday, Sept. 7

On this date in 1865, Camp McDowell was established by five companies of the California Volunteers and named after Maj. Gen. Irwin McDowell.

On this date in 1868, one of the worst rains ever recorded in southern Arizona began and continued until Sept. 11. The Gila River swelled to more than 4 miles in width, destroying everything in its path. Tucson’s new courthouse, completed only a few months earlier, was seriously damaged, with its walls split and roof leaking.

Tuesday, Sept. 8

On this date in 1850, Congress passed the Omnibus Bill, making Arizona and New Mexico one territory with the proviso that “Nothing in this Act shall be construed to inhibit the United States from dividing said Territory into two or more Territories.”

On this date in 1886, Geronimo and his band were assembled and marched from Fort Bowie to Bowie Station where they were loaded on trains bound for Florida. The 4th Cavalry Regimental Band played “Auld Lang Syne” as the Apaches boarded the trains.

On this date in 1936, a wild buffalo was discovered four miles south of San Simon. It was finally chased into a corral on the Melvis Smith Ranch where it tossed range cows over its head.

Wednesday, Sept. 9

On this date in 1899, a Southern Pacific train was held up at Cochise and $10,000 stolen. Two Cochise County law enforcement officers were later caught and convicted of the crime.

On this date in 1921, Old Fort Rucker burned. The 42-year-old fort, situated far up in Rucker Canyon in the Swisshelm Mountains, had been serving as the home of cattleman Charles Rak and his wife at the time of the fire.

Thursday, Sept. 10

On this date in 1916, Glendale and Phoenix were flooded when the Arizona, Grand and Maricopa canals were breached by flood waters.

On this date in 1929, Judge J.E. Jones, northern Arizona’s pioneer, died at his home in Flagstaff. Jones had been the first probate judge of Coconino County and had once published a weekly paper - the Flagstaff Democrat.

On this date in 1936, Francisco Hernandez, pioneer Tucson stonemason, died. He had helped build the old courthouse, the Carnegie Library, St. Joseph Academy and the first structure at the University of Arizona. Also on this date, Tucson and Pima County applied to the federal government for permission to construct a 250-foot high dam in Sabino Canyon.

Friday, Sept. 11

On this date in 1898, a fire destroyed the city of Jerome. Every residence and all but one business in the town were destroyed. Three people were killed and 1,500 left homeless.

On this date in 1899, the doors of the Northern Arizona Normal School, now Northern Arizona University, opened for the first time.

On this date in 1911, free liquor passed out at Republican Campaign Headquarters on Meyer Street in Tucson resulted in two shootings.

On this date in 1929, the municipal market in Nogales, Mexico, burned down. Fire equipment from Nogales, Arizona, and from Camp Stephen D. Little crossed the line to assist Sonoran firefighters until the city hall siren brought them back into Arizona to extinguish a blaze at the George B. Marsh hardware store.

On this date in 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a button in Washington and 12 huge valves opened at the Hoover Dam to generate the first electric power produced by the dam.

Saturday, Sept. 12

On this date in 1890, the Democratic Territorial Convention met in Phoenix and police had to be called to quell the floor battle for control of the convention.

On this date in 1893, cattlemen and farmers of Cochise and Graham counties were warned to go armed at all times as the Apache Kid was believed to be in the area.


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide