- Associated Press - Tuesday, August 2, 2016

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) - The Latest on Washington state’s primary election (all times local):

10:08 p.m.

Seattle voters overwhelmingly rejected a measure that would’ve built an elevated park in downtown Seattle using part of the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

More than 80 percent of early votes Tuesday were cast against Initiative 123, which was opposed by many city leaders who prefer a comprehensive redesign of the city’s waterfront once the viaduct is removed and replaced by a tunnel.

The Seattle tunnel was the preferred choice to replace the viaduct when it was damaged in a 2001 earthquake. But the tunnel boring machine broke down in late 2013, leading to a more than two-year delay while it was fixed.

The original completion date for the tunnel was the fall of 2015 but the opening is now projected for early 2019.

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9:43 p.m.

Washington Supreme Court Justice Barbara Madsen advanced in the primary election with 64 percent of the early vote, as did Kittitas County Prosecutor Greg Zempel, with 29 percent of the vote.

Justices Mary Yu and Charlie Wiggins each have just one challenger so they didn’t appear on Tuesday’s primary ballot but will be before voters in November.

In other statewide contests, five featured races without an incumbent running.

The crowded race to replace Lt. Gov. Brad Owen was too close to call. Republican Marty McClendon narrowly led Democrats Cyrus Habib, Karen Fraser and Steve Hobbs. Two Republicans, Duane Davidson and Michael Waite, were leading in the contest to succeed State Treasurer Jim McIntire. In the race to replace State Auditor Troy Kelley, Republican Mark Miloscia and Democrat Pat McCarthy were ahead of other candidates. For office of Superintendent of Public Instruction, Chris Reykdal and Erin Jones led other challengers and Republican Steve McLaughlin and Democrat Hilary Franz looked set to advance in the Commissioner of Public Lands race.

In all primary contests the top two vote getters go on to the November ballot, regardless of party.

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8:45 p.m.

Democratic State Rep. Pramila Jayapal has advanced to the general election in the race to succeed Rep Jim McDermott, the long-time Seattle congressman who is retiring after nearly 30 years in office.

But which fellow Democrat she’ll face in November was still undecided after early results in Tuesday’s primary election. Jayapal was taking about 38 percent of the vote, while State Rep. Brady Walkinshaw and King County Councilman Joe McDermott, no relation to Jim McDermott, were each at about 21 percent. The top two vote getters, regardless of party, go on to the November ballot.

Jim McDermott, a Democrat first elected in 1988, served 14 terms in Congress. In early January, he announced that he would not seek re-election to his 7th Congressional District seat.

The liberal-leaning 7th District includes most of Seattle, as well as Vashon Island and several Seattle suburbs.

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8:35 p.m.

Incumbent Democratic Sen. Patty Murray has advanced to the general election, where she’ll face Republican Chris Vance.

Murray and Vance were leading all other candidates in early primary returns Tuesday. The top two vote getters, regardless of party, advance to November contest.

Murray, first elected in 1992, is seeking her fifth term in the U.S. Senate. Vance is a former King County Councilman and the former head of the state Republican Party.

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8:22 p.m.

Gov. Jay Inslee will face Republican Bill Bryant in November.

The Democrat Inslee and Bryant easily advanced to the general election following Tuesday’s primary. Under Washington’s primary system the top two vote getters appear on the November ballot, regardless of party.

Inslee, a former long-time congressman, is seeking a second term. Bryant is a former Seattle port commissioner.

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5:31 p.m.

The secretary of state’s office has predicted turnout for the Washington state primary will be at about 41 percent, and as of Tuesday afternoon about 24 percent of the 4.1 million ballots sent to voters had been returned.

Ballots must be either postmarked or dropped off at a local drop box by Tuesday.

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9:41 a.m.

Several prominent Democrats are vying to succeed Rep. Jim McDermott, the longtime Seattle congressman who is retiring after nearly 30 years in office.

McDermott, a Democrat first elected in 1988, served 14 terms in Congress. In early January, he announced he would not seek re-election to his 7th District seat.

State Rep. Brady Walkinshaw was the first prominent Democrat to enter the race, challenging McDermott even before his retirement announcement. State Rep. Pramila Jayapa and King County Councilman Joe McDermott, no relation to Jim McDermott, later announced their candidacies.

The top two vote getters, regardless of party, advance to the November election.

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12:17 a.m.

Washington’s voters are weighing in on dozens of races across the state as they winnow their choices for offices ranging from Congress to the Legislature in the state’s primary election.

Voters will decide Tuesday between 11 candidates for governor, though Democratic incumbent Gov. Jay Inslee and Republican challenger Bill Bryant are expected to easily advance to November. The open seat for lieutenant governor has also drawn 11 candidates, including three Democratic state senators. Other open statewide races include: auditor, lands commissioner, treasurer and superintendent of public instruction.

More than four million of the state’s registered voters started receiving their ballots in the mail weeks ago for the top two primary, in which the top two vote getters advance to the November ballot, regardless of party. Because Washington is an all-mail-ballot state, results may take days to come in as the ballots - which just need to be postmarked by Tuesday - arrive in elections offices.

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