- Associated Press - Tuesday, February 2, 2016

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - The latest on New Mexico lawmakers’ REAL ID debate (all times local):

7:15 p.m.

A key New Mexico Senate committee has passed a bill lawmakers called a “compromise” aimed at making New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

Senators voted 8-1 to combine a bipartisan bill with a recently passed version out of the Republican-controlled House as pressure mounted to pass a REAL ID fix.

The compromise would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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7 p.m.

A key New Mexico Senate committee is trying to combine proposals to make New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

Senators debated Tuesday on merging a bipartisan bill with a recently passed version out of the Republican-controlled House.

Republican Sen. Stuart Ingle says the move was needed to get a compromise out of the full Senate and get it back in the House in time before the 30-day Legislative session ends in less than three weeks.

The compromise would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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5:30 p.m.

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez is throwing his support behind a bipartisan compromise to make New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

Sanchez spokesman Jim Farrell said Tuesday the senator supports a bill that would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

But Republican Gov. Susana Martinez says that bill doesn’t require fingerprints for immigrants and still opened up the state to fraud.

Sanchez said in a January letter he was open to fingerprinting.

Farrell says Sanchez is open to supporting provisions that lead to a compromise.

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4:15 p.m.

Democratic Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez says he’s open to stronger security measures to make New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

Sanchez spokesman Jim Farrell said Tuesday the senator would support a Republican provision to require immigrants in the country illegally to submit fingerprints before receiving state driver’s permit cards.

A bipartisan proposal introduced Monday would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.” Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

Gov. Susana Martinez and Republicans say that bill didn’t have the fingerprint requirements and still opened up the state to fraud.

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3:45 p.m.

A New Mexico Senate committee has begun debate on various proposals aimed at making New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

The Senate Public Affairs Committee is discussing Tuesday competing bills amid pressure to come up with a REAL ID fix.

Immigrant advocates are expected to speak against bills that take away state driver’s licenses from immigrants in the country illegally.

A bipartisan proposal introduced Monday combines elements of Democratic and Republican bills in an effort to end a stalemate among lawmakers.

That bill would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.” Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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1:30 p.m.

New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez says a new compromise bill aimed at making New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act lacks needed security safeguards.

Martinez spokesman Chris Sanchez said Tuesday the bipartisan proposal doesn’t require fingerprints for immigrants in the country illegally who could obtain a driver’s permit card.

Sanchez said such security safeguards needs to be in any REAL ID fix to prevent fraud.

The proposal introduced by Democratic Sen. John Arthur Smith and Republican Sen. Stuart Ingle combines elements of dueling Democratic and Republicans plans.

The bill would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.” Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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11:30 a.m.

A New Mexico Senate committee will take up a new compromise bill aimed at making New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID act.

Senate Majority Leader spokesman Jim Farrell told The Associated Press that the Senate Public Affairs Committee added the bipartisan proposal to the agenda on Tuesday, and will debate it along with four other bills.

The proposal introduced by Democratic Sen. John Arthur Smith and Republican Sen. Stuart Ingle combines elements of dueling Democratic and Republicans plans.

The bill would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s permit card.” Under the proposal, immigrants in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for the permit card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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1:30 a.m.

The fate of a REAL ID fix in New Mexico is now in the hands of Senate Democrats.

A key Senate committee is scheduled Tuesday to hear proposals that would bring New Mexico into compliance with tougher identification requirements under the federal REAL ID Act.

But how Senate Democrats respond to the proposals will determine if they face a backlash if the driver’s license problem isn’t fixed.

A GOP plan would grant state driving privilege cards for immigrants - even those suspected of living in the country illegally. A Democrat version would create a “two tier” system.

The REAL ID Act requires proof of legal U.S. residency for those who want to use state identification to access certain areas of federal facilities. New Mexico has no such requirement and allows immigrants to get state driver’s licenses regardless of legal status.

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