- Associated Press - Friday, February 5, 2016

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) - The latest on New Mexico lawmakers’ REAL ID debate (all times local):

4:30 p.m.

A second Senate committee has passed a bipartisan proposal aimed at making New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

The Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approved Friday a measure that would create “driver’s authorization card” following emotional pleas some senators.

Under the proposal, immigrants living in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for that card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

Democratic Sen. Joseph Cervantes urged senators to pass a REAL ID fix. He said he knew someone close who couldn’t visit a dying father because Fort Bliss in El Paso was no longer accepting New Mexico driver’s licenses from entry.

The bill now goes to the Senate Finance Committee chaired by Sen. John Arthur Smith, a co-sponsor of the compromise bill.

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4 p.m.

New Mexico Democratic Senate Majority Leader Michael Sanchez says he’s received a number of racist calls and letters over the REAL ID debate.

Sanchez told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Friday that one caller demanded that he to “go back to Mexico” and another claimed he was a member of a Mexican drug cartel.

Sanchez was born in Belen, New Mexico and is a lawyer.

The Belen Democrat talked about the racist messages during a debate over a bill that would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID-compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s authorization card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants living in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for that card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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3:30 p.m.

A bipartisan Senate proposal aimed putting New Mexico in compliance under the federal REAL ID Act is getting its second test.

The Senate Judiciary Committee has begun debate Friday on a bill that would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID-compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s authorization card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants living in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for that card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

However, House Republicans say the measure doesn’t require fingerprints from immigrants and that provision might kill the bill. Gov. Susana Martinez has threatened to veto any bill without the fingerprint provision because of fraud concerns.

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12:30 p.m.

A Democratic New Mexico senator says House Republicans and Gov. Susana Martinez are holding the state “hostage” over a disagreement in passing a REAL ID bill.

Sen. Daniel Ivey-Soto told The Associated Press that Republicans’ obsession with demanding fingerprints for immigrants could thwart a bipartisan compromise.

But the Albuquerque Democrat says senators are willing to listen to suggestions so lawmakers could pass a measure to make New Mexico compliant under the federal REAL ID Act.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled Friday to tackle a bipartisan proposal that would allow all New Mexico residents to apply for REAL ID-compliant licenses or obtain a “driver’s authorization card.”

Under the proposal, immigrants living in the country illegally would be allowed to apply for that card but could no longer get a New Mexico driver’s license.

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12 a.m.

Advocates say they will give up the right for immigrants living in the country illegally to obtain New Mexico driver’s licenses to achieve a REAL ID compromise.

Immigrant rights groups say they can live with a bipartisan proposal that instead would allow those immigrants and other residents to get “driver’s authorization card.” Marcela Diaz, executive director of Santa Fe-based advocacy group Somos Un Pueblo Unido, says she doesn’t believe that bill singles out or discriminates against immigrants.

However, passage may hinge on whether those immigrants will be required to submit fingerprints for background checks before getting cards.

House Majority Leader Nate Gentry said without the fingerprint requirements the revamped bill won’t pass the GOP-controlled House. Gov. Susana Martinez also promised to veto any measure without the fingerprint provision.

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