- Associated Press - Friday, July 29, 2016

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The Latest on a Utah businessman convicted of lying to banks to keep his online business afloat (all times local):

11:36 a.m.

A Utah businessman who was a central figure in a pay-for-play scandal involving two former state attorneys general was sentenced Friday to 11 years and three months in prison on convictions of lying to banks to keep his online business afloat.

U.S. District Judge David Nuffer said Johnson became comfortable with lying, concealing and deceiving in a carefully planned and contrived scheme. He told Johnson before a packed courtroom his actions tainted all the good things he’s done in his life.

Federal prosecutor Jason Burt argued that Jonson should receive a lengthy prison sentence because he is an unremorseful, greedy “schemer” who took advantage of people who trusted him.



Johnson didn’t speak during the hearing. His attorney Mary Corporon said Johnson, a husband and father of two girls, has a good heart and good intentions and is worth salvaging. Corporon said that won’t happen if he’s sent to prison for many years.

Johnson was convicted on eight counts of making false statements to banks, but the jury cleared him of dozens more charges, including fraud and conspiracy.

___

2:57 a.m.

A helicopter-flying Utah businessman who was a central figure in a pay-to-play scandal involving two former state attorneys general is set to be sentenced for lying to banks to keep his online business afloat.

Federal prosecutors contend Jeremy Johnson is a con man who should get up to 22 years in prison at a sentencing hearing set for Friday.

Johnson says he was transparent in his business dealings and prosecutors cherry-picked emails to build their case. He was convicted on eight counts of making false statements to banks, but the jury cleared him of dozens more charges, including fraud and conspiracy.

He’s been held in jail ahead of sentencing since April. U.S. District Judge David Nuffer decided Thursday Johnson won’t get a break for helping with a separate investigation into the state’s former top lawmen.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Manage Newsletters

Copyright © 2020 The Washington Times, LLC.

Please read our comment policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide