- Associated Press - Saturday, March 12, 2016

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Latest on the District of Columbia’s GOP caucus (all times local):

10:25 p.m.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio narrowly won the District of Columbia’s Republican caucuses on Saturday, seizing his third primary season victory as a critical contest looms in his home state.

Party officials in the nation’s capital say Rubio picked up 10 delegates with his Saturday caucus win in the nation’s capital with 37 percent of the ballot. Runner-up John Kasich was just 50 votes behind Rubio at 36 percent, and the Ohio governor will get nine delegates.

None of the other candidates in the race won enough votes to earn any delegates from the contest, in which 2,839 votes were cast. Billionaire businessman Donald Trump was third with 14 percent of the vote and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz followed with 12 percent, according to the results.



Rubio previously won the GOP caucuses in Minnesota and the party primary in Puerto Rico. Fueled in part by anxiety over Trump, District Republicans flocked to a downtown hotel Saturday to cast ballots in the city’s first-of-its-kind presidential convention.

___

10:01 p.m.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio has won the District of Columbia’s Republican convention.

The victory for Rubio is his third of the primary season. Earlier this month, Rubio won the GOP caucuses in Minnesota and the party’s primary in Puerto Rico.

Rubio picked up 10 delegates with his Saturday caucus win in the nation’s capital. Runner-up John Kasich was just 50 votes behind Rubio, and the Ohio governor will get nine delegates.

None of the other candidates in the race won enough votes to earn any delegates.

___

7:25 p.m.

Some voters waited in line for more than three hours to cast ballots in the District of Columbia’s Republican presidential convention.

The convention had to be extended because hundreds of GOP voters who remained in line at 4 p.m. Saturday, when polls were scheduled to close for most voting groups. The last of those waiting in line voted about 7:15 p.m. though an opportunity remained for any Orthodox Jews to vote after sundown.

Nineteen delegates are at stake in the convention, which has been little-watched nationally with primaries looming in Florida, Ohio and other states on Tuesday.

The District has just 27,000 registered Republicans. Local party leaders say they’re thrilled with the turnout at the convention, which functions like a primary at a single precinct. Thousands of people have voted so far, and many say they’re eager to see anyone but Donald Trump win.___

4:25 p.m.

Voting at the District of Columbia’s Republican presidential convention has been extended because hundreds of GOP voters are still waiting in line.

Nineteen delegates are at stake in the convention, which has been little-watched nationally with primaries looming in Florida, Ohio and other states on Tuesday.

The District has just 27,000 registered Republicans. Local party leaders say they’re thrilled with the turnout at the convention, which functions like a primary at a single precinct. Thousands of people have voted so far, and many say they’re eager to see anyone but Donald Trump win.

Polls were scheduled to close at 4 p.m., but District GOP executive director Partick Mara says anyone who got in line by that time would be allowed to vote. There also will be an opportunity for Orthodox Jews to vote after sundown.

___

1:25 p.m.

People wanting to vote in the District of Columbia’s GOP caucus are facing more than an hour’s wait to get into the Loews Madison Hotel to cast their ballot. The line to get in was over two city blocks long.

The District will send 19 delegates to the convention - as many as Hawaii and only four fewer than New Hampshire. They’ll be allocated proportionally, unless one candidate gets more than 50 percent of the vote, which would make it winner-take-all.

Results are expected to be announced around 9 p.m. Saturday.

___

1:10 p.m.

Despite the intense campaigning by Donald Trump and his rivals in big states like Florida and Ohio, the next GOP nominating contest is in the nation’s capital.

The District of Columbia’s small contingent of Republican voters will cast ballots Saturday at a downtown hotel, with 19 delegates at stake. The event is called a convention, but it’s more like a primary with just a single place to vote.

Since nobody has polled the District’s 27,000 registered Republicans, it’s not clear whether Trump or someone else has the edge. But Republicans who live in Washington tend to be moderate and to favor establishment candidates. Marco Rubio has the most endorsements among the 160 people running for delegate, followed by John Kasich.

Results are expected to be announced around 9 p.m. Saturday.

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