- Associated Press - Sunday, March 13, 2016

LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) - Shane Burry and his bicycles have been to some stunning places.

During their travels - he commutes most days - he noticed that Lexington looked different up close, as opposed to the prism of a dashboard and a swath of auto glass.

So he started taking photos on his iPhone of the places he stopped - specifically, photos of his bike in those charming sites. He then posted them to Facebook and Instagram, where he has more than 1,300 followers, usually adding an observation or an uplifting quote or two.

On Feb. 22, he posted a quote from To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, who died three days earlier: “Real courage is when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.” Accompanying the quote was a photo taken from behind the bike in a leafy autumnal clearing.

On Feb. 20, the bike was near the water tower at The Arboretum and the quote was from Voltaire: “The most important decision you make is to be in a good mood.”

On Feb. 8, it was the color explosion of the décor at Third Street Stuff, with the bicycle in front, the legend “Home is where you paint” in the back and an Eartha Kitt quote: “It’s about falling in love with yourself and sharing that love with someone who appreciates you.”

On Jan. 22, he stopped at Wild Fig Books and Coffee at 726 North Limestone “for wild lemonade, sweet potato muffin and good conversation today.”

Although he has no formal photographic training, Burry likes bright colors, brick and a nicely layered sky. He likes urban art, the Legacy Trail, Third Street Stuff, Limestone Street, horses, country roads, the weathered sides of buildings and sometimes places east of Lexington, including the Red River Gorge and Prestonsburg, where he and his wife have family.

In Lexington, Burry and his wife, Heather Karfit-Burry, both 36, live near Castlewood Park with their three cats. Burry, who was raised in Minnesota and Ohio, has been riding bikes “my whole life. I went through all the styles,” from BMX through mountain, he said.

He later enlisted in the United States Army, where he became involved in group-exercise instruction.

One of his first bike photos was at the Isaac Murphy Memorial. He posted it “to let people know you can see and explore these beautiful sites,” Burry said.

He frequently commutes via bicycle to his job as a personal trainer at Fitness Plus on National Avenue and to the Lexington Healing Arts Academy on Southland Drive, but he also rides longer routes for fun and exercise, including to Jessamine, Woodford and Bourbon counties.

“I like to show that when you leave Lexington, there’s a lot out there, too,” Burry said of his photographs. “I tell people, outside is free. You can just go for a walk. . We have a lot of treasures.”

Being a bike enthusiast also means that parking is a problem for other people, and you can immediately appreciate the up-close nuances of a place: “It’s healthy. It’s fun. It’s enjoyable. You can just pop right off your bike.”

Although Burry is an avid cyclist, there are a few things that get him off the bike: pouring rain on a dark night, because it’s difficult for motorists to see bicyclists, and black ice, which makes it difficult for bicycles to grip the road.

But Burry loves fresh snow. “It’s wonderful to bike through.”

He has three bikes: a racing bike, a wet-weather road bike and a mountain bike.

One of the best matches between words and picture is the bike poised between a big rock cut in Eastern Kentucky, handlebars straight ahead, the road clear, the day filled with green. Burry has attached a C.S. Lewis quote: “There are far, far better things ahead than any we leave behind.”

It fits.

___

Information from: Lexington Herald-Leader, https://www.kentucky.com


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