- Associated Press - Friday, September 2, 2016

Forty-six states have laws against texting while driving that typically also ban sending or reading email, using apps or engaging in other internet activity. Fourteen states bar drivers from using hand-held cellphones for any activity, including talking on the phone.

A look at cellphone driving laws and how they are enforced in five states:

___

CALIFORNIA

Bans hand-held cellphones for all uses, including talking and texting.

Citation convictions for texting increased from 2,845 in 2009 to 31,492 in 2015.

___

FLORIDA

Bans texting while driving as a secondary offense, meaning drivers must be stopped for another violation before they can be cited for texting.

Texting violations dropped from 1,587 in 2014 to 1,359 in 2015.

___

MASSACHUSETTS

Bans texting while driving as a primary offense.

Texting citations increased from 1,148 in 2011 to 6,131 in 2015.

___

NEW YORK

Bans hand-held cellphones for all uses, including talking and texting.

Tickets for texting increased from 9,015 in 2011 to 84,757 in 2015.

___

WASHINGTON

Bans hand-held cellphones for all uses, including talking and texting.

Texting citations increased from 118 in 2008 to 2,049 in 2015. (Citations issued by Washington State Patrol only.)

Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times is switching its third-party commenting system from Disqus to Spot.IM. You will need to either create an account with Spot.im or if you wish to use your Disqus account look under the Conversation for the link "Have a Disqus Account?". Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More

Click to Hide