- The Washington Times - Saturday, August 26, 2017

At least one person has died so far as a result of Hurricane Harvey, CNN reported Saturday afternoon.

“It was someone that was caught in the fire and his house, during the storm, and we didn’t know about it until today,” Aransas County Judge Burt Mills Jr. told CNN during an interview at about 2 p.m. local time Saturday.

The deceased was not immediately identified.

Earlier in the afternoon, the governor of Texas said at a press conference Saturday afternoon that he was unaware of any deaths related to Hurricane Harvey roughly 12 hours after the storm made landfall.

“We don’t have any information right now that we can confirm any fatalities,” Mr. Abbott told reporters in Austin shortly after 1 p.m. local time Saturday.

The governor’s announcement came during a status update half a day after Harvey first made landfall in southeastern Texas, unleashing 130 mph winds and torrential rain along its Gulf coast from Corpus Christi to Houston.

The storm had been upgraded to a category four hurricane shortly before making landfall but was weakened to a tropical story by Saturday afternoon.

So far Harvey has dropped about 20 inches of rain on Corpus Christi and more than a foot on Houston, Mr. Abbott said Saturday.

“That is coming down on already saturated ground and already filled-up waterways,” the governor added, “…so there is potential for very dramatic flooding.”

“Because of the flooding, one of the top focal points that were are concerned about is ongoing rescue and recovery,” he added, calling those missions “one of the foremost tasks that we take in the coming days.”

About 1,500 evacuees had taken shelter at state parks as of Saturday afternoon, and another 1,450 or were at shelters operated by the Red Cross, Mr. Abbott said.

Upwards of 338,000 customers of Texas Public Utility Commission were without electricity, he added.

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