- The Washington Times - Monday, February 13, 2017

Geraldo Rivera announced Sunday that he resigned from his fellowship position at Yale University after the Ivy League school decided to rename a college named after 19th-century Vice President John C. Calhoun because of his support for slavery.

Mr. Rivera announced on Twitter that he officially resigned as an associate fellow of Calhoun College, which has been renamed to honor trailblazing computer scientist Grace Murray Hopper.

“Been an honor but intolerant insistence on political correctness is lame,” Mr. Rivera wrote.

“Slavery was abhorrent sin. Will #Yale students now petition to change name of #USA capital? #Washington was a slave holder as was #Jefferson,” he added. “To judge a 200 yr old early 19th century historic figure by standards of the 21st century as #Yale is doing is more Orwellian than inspired.

“His ideas are repugnant but #CalhounCollege name change would shock #JFK who named John C Calhoun 1 of 5 ‘greatest’ all-time senators in 1957,” Mr. Rivera wrote.

Yale said in a statement Sunday that it respected Mr. Rivera’s decision, but said the decision to rename the college was based on principle, not political correctness, the Associated Press reported.

Calhoun College has been a point of controversy at Yale for years, with university president Peter Salovey defending keeping the name as recently as April. After appointing an advisory panel to explore its options, the board of trustees ultimately decided Friday to rename the college.

The head of Calhoun College, now named Hopper College, Julia Adams, told the Yale Daily News that she received an email from Mr. Rivera confirming his resignation.

“I regret the resignation, as I told Mr. Rivera, but do not agree that ‘political correctness’ rather than principled decision-making was at issue,” Ms. Adams said. “However, I appreciate Mr. Rivera’s acknowledgment of the honor.”

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