- The Washington Times - Saturday, January 28, 2017

A major manufacturer is banking on the idea that “there’s nothing sexier than a man who cleans.” That’s the thinking at Procter & Gamble, which has converted longtime ad symbol Mr. Clean into a fit and suggestive “cleaner of your dreams.”

This is definitely not your mother’s Mr. Clean. He wear a tight white t-shirt and even tighter white pants; he essentially twerks while operating a vacuum. A new 30-second spot shows him on the verge of seducing a mesmerized housewife.

“Mr. Clean gets dirty. Mr. Clean proves he’s got what it takes to satisfy your needs in every room of the house,” the manufacturer explains, and indeed the animated hunk does just that in the commercial, which debuts during the Super Bowl on Feb. 5 before a global audience.

The take-away message intends to show that couples who share chores equally are more likely to have a happier relationship. An intricate social media campaign is already underway for Mr. Clean, who has championed the fastidious life for 60 years.

“Mr. Clean — both the man and his products — has always stood for toughness and versatility,” said Martin Hettich, vice president of Procter & Gamble’s North American office. “In his first-ever Super Bowl spot, Mr. Clean is showing off his strong and sexy side, and hopefully even inspiring men across America to pick up a mop and bucket themselves.”

The 30-second spot, which does have some suggestive moments, also has a happy ending involving the husband of the household. See the ad here.

A new Mr. Clean — the human version — has also been selected after a three-month public competition which involved athletes, actors and even a few female hopefuls. Mike Jackson, a sports marketing analyst, won the title along with $20,000 and a PR contract which includes an in-person appearance at the Super Bowl with Denver Broncos outside linebacker DeMarcus Ware, himself voted “MCP” — “most clean player.”

 


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