- Associated Press - Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Sunday, July 30

On this date in 1872, a corporation was formed in San Francisco to develop diamond fields in northern Arizona. The undertaking was eventually proven to be a swindle which became known as the “Great Diamond Hoax.”

On this date in 1921, Gov. Thomas E. Campbell canceled the state fair to save taxpayers $90,000.

On this date in 2010, three convicted murderers escaped from Arizona State Prison in Golden Valley near Kingman by cutting a hole in the prison’s perimeter fence. Daniel Renwick was captured a day later in Colorado. Tracy Province and John McCluskey were recaptured after a crime spree that included the kidnapping and murder of Oklahomans Gary and Linda Haas in New Mexico.

Monday, July 31

On this date in 1875, Capt. A.W. Corliss, commanding at Fort McDowell, reported to the Department of Arizona Headquarters that the roof on one wing of the guard house had fallen in and the roof on the main building was liable to fall in at any moment.

On this date in 1903, the Prescott Journal Miner announced that the hanging of two murderers “was from a professional or official standpoint” a perfect success.

Tuesday, Aug. 1

On this date in 1861, Lt. Col. John R. Baylor proclaimed the Confederate Territory of Arizona, with the Territorial capitol at Mesilla, and himself as military governor. The new Confederate Territory extended from Texas to California and lay generally south of the Gila River.

On this date in 2006, the Arizona Cardinals’ new home, University of Phoenix Stadium, opens in Glendale.

Wednesday, Aug. 2

On this date in 1905, unknown assassins fired into a group of Silverbell miners, killing two and wounding one, for no apparent reason.

On this date in 1929, passengers on transcontinental trains, which were delayed by washouts, cleaned out the entire food supply of many small towns. The town of Bowie reported nothing left but coffee.

Thursday, Aug. 3

On this date in 1918, the Casa Grande Ruins became a national monument.

On this date in 1929, a cyclone followed by an electrical storm and heavy rain did $50,000 damage in the Yuma area.

On this date in 2006, serial shooter suspects Dale Hausner and Samuel John Dieteman are arrested in Mesa. Police say the men would drive through the Phoenix area and select random targets in a shooting spree that left five people dead and 16 wounded since May 2005.

Friday, Aug. 4

On this date in 1859, the first issue of the Weekly Arizonian was published, with J. Howard Wells as editor. The Weekly Arizonian was the first newspaper in Arizona, having been established in Tubac on March 3, 1859.

On this date in 1895, the first packing house in Arizona was opened in Phoenix. The plant included 400 acres of alfalfa, a system of gates, lanes and driveways leading to the slaughter house, sausage rooms and cooling rooms.

On this date in 1908, a heavy rainstorm sent floods roaring down Tombstone Canyon in Bisbee. The library, post office and many store basements were flooded.

Saturday, Aug. 5

On this date in 1892, Grady Gammage, former president of Arizona State College, now Arizona State University, was born.

On this date in 1895, Pete Kitchen, one of the earliest ranchers in the Santa Cruz Valley, died.

On this date in 1911, William C. Greene of the Greene Cattle Co. and the Greene Cananea Copper Co. died after being thrown from a buggy.

On this date in 1917, the 1st Arizona Regiment was drafted into the United States Army. By the end of World War I, 8,113 men in Arizona had entered the National Guard, 1,854 were in the regular army, 1,269 in the Navy and 147 in the Marines. Three hundred and twenty-one Arizonans died in military service.

On this date in 1931, a Southern Pacific passenger train, The Argonaut, was derailed east of Yuma, killing two and injuring 15.

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