- - Thursday, March 23, 2017

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Rape was once a capital crime almost everywhere. But the politically correct culture, with its gift for dumbing down everything, regards rape now not as a felony, but a misdemeanor, something like shoplifting.

The abduction of a 14-year-old girl at Rockville High School in Maryland’s Montgomery County by two classmates, newly arrived illegal immigrants, who are charged with torturing, raping and sodomizing her in the boys’ restroom, has outraged most of the residents of the county.

But some of the county officials, not so much. Outrage is fatiguing. In Montgomery County, which aspires to be a sanctuary for illegal aliens in trouble with the law, it’s more fashionable to be outraged by Donald Trump.

The superintendent of Montgomery County public schools regrets the incident, and all that, but retreats to a sanctuary of his own in educationist bromides. He says the schools have a responsibility to educate “all young people in the county,” and educators can’t be expected to question the backgrounds, or the immigration status, of prospective students.

“We serve every student who walks through our doors,” says Jack Smith, the superintendent. “We are a public school system and we serve all of our students when they come to us. It’s not only the right thing to do. It’s also the law of the land.”

Jessica Vaughn, the director of policy studies at the Center for Immigration Studies, puts some of the blame on the federal government and others who encourage the waves of illegals “to come on in.” Barack Obama created policies, she says, that invited prospective migrants to take advantage of lax enforcement of the law on the border. Once children were inside the United States, whether legal or not, the Obama administration put severe pressure on cities and counties to put them in school.

“I think this is a problem that was dropped on Montgomery County,” she says, “and lots of other school systems. Even the decision to place them in the high schools — even that, it sounds crazy, but at least one other school system got in trouble for not accommodating them and faced legal action.”

Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, first demanded that Montgomery County fully cooperate with the investigation, and questioned why 18-year-old young men are put in classes with 13- and 14-year-old girls in the first place. County officials were naturally outraged, not necessarily by the crime, but by the governor’s suggestion that the county was not all it could be.

The governor made a strategic retreat the next day, with the assurance that now he thinks the school system, the police and the county are finally taking the incident seriously.

If so, that’s good news. But, typically of “sanctuary cities and counties,” where officials claim the right to ignore law enforcement they don’t approve of, Montgomery County officials seem more interested in the rights of arriving newcomers than the rights of the people who already live here.

Superintendent Smith boasts that the schools he supervises serve “every student who walks through our doors.” That’s a worthy goal, but the 14-year-old girl who was stripped, tortured and abused at the hands of her tormentors might observe that she was not served very well, and that the superintendent and the schools still have work to do.

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