- The Washington Times - Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Black Lives Matter protesters on Saturday crashed the wedding venue of one of the two police officers who shot and killed Stephon Clark in Sacramento earlier this year.

A small group of protesters tracked down the officer’s wedding at a vineyard about an hour outside of Sacramento and showed up just hours before he was set to say, “I do,” a local CBS affiliate reported.

Video posted on Facebook by Sacramento Black Lives Matter showed the protesters accosting the officer, who police have not identified due to safety concerns, while he was gathered in a room with his groomsmen. 

“I just wonder if you started planning your wedding before you killed Stephon Clark or after?” a white female protester asked the officer, who is black, in the video. “How have you been sleeping since March 18?”

“You’re a murderer!” another protester yelled as they were quickly ushered out of the room by the officer’s wedding party.

Organizers of the protest said they didn’t think it was inappropriate to confront the officer in that setting.

“I think they need to be approached in spaces where they’re a little more vulnerable,” Sacramento BLM founder Tanya Faison told CBS. “We’re not violent, we’re not gonna give to them what they brought to our community, we’re not gonna hurt anyone but we are gonna make them uncomfortable, and they should because someone is dead.”

Sacramento police said the two police officers have needed additional security amid a torrent of death threats since the March shooting, which sparked nationwide protests.

Sacramento Police Officers Association President Timothy Davis issued a statement Monday night imploring the community to “give our officers the ability to safely raise their families alongside you,” CBS reported.

“Our police officers are members of this community,” the statement read, in part. “They raise their families here. The send their children to schools here. They live their lives as a part of this community. Transparency comes with responsibility. Officers deserve to be free from harassment by individuals seeking their own forms of justice. True accountability can only come from our impartial judicial system and from our elected government.”


Copyright © 2018 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide