- The Washington Times - Monday, June 17, 2019

Disgraced comedian Bill Cosby raised more than a few eyebrows Sunday after he wished fans a happy Father’s Day from prison.

“Hey, Hey, Hey…It’s America’s Dad…I know it’s late, but to all of the Dads,” Mr. Cosby’s account tweeted late Sunday. “It’s an honor to be called a Father, so let’s make today a renewed oath to fulfilling our purpose — strengthening our families and communities.”

Included in his message, which was also posted on Instagram, was a 1968 video of Mr. Cosby talking about racism and slavery during a CBS black history month special.


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“After slavery was over, America kept breaking up the black man’s family and that’s some awful history to teach,” Mr. Cosby, who was 31 at the time, says in the video. “This country has got a psychological history — there was a master race and there was a slave race. And though there isn’t any political slavery anymore, those same old attitudes have hung around.”

Mr. Cosby, now 81, is currently incarcerated at a state prison near Philadelphia after he was convicted last year on three counts of aggravated indecent assault. More than 50 women have accused Mr. Cosby, formerly known as “America’s Dad,” of drugging and rape.



Social media commenters immediately called out Mr. Cosby for lecturing on values.

A spokesman for Mr. Cosby said he had requested that the message be posted in support of the nonprofit group, Man Up.

Mr. Cosby’s [message] consisted of telling these men who have been incarcerated for many years, but are up for parole soon … to … take the word ‘disadvantage’ and remove the ‘dis,’ and start focusing on the advantage,” spokesman Andrew Wyatt told USA Today. “That advantage is to be better fathers and productive citizens.”

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