- Associated Press - Monday, May 13, 2019

SALEM, Ore. (AP) - The Latest on efforts to end a standoff over a school funding tax in Oregon (all times local):

4:47 p.m.

The Oregon Senate has approved a multibillion dollar education tax designed to boost student performance and decrease class sizes.

The chamber passed the bill 18 to 11 Monday afternoon after minority Republicans ended a nearly week-long walkout to protest the levy. The measure previously passed the House and now heads to Gov. Kate Brown for her signature.

It would raise $1 billion per year through a half a percent tax on Oregon’s wealthiest businesses.



The package calls for a .057% tax on gross receipts for businesses with $1 million or more in sales, which make up less than 10% of all businesses in the state.

___

3:11 p.m.

Republicans in the Senate have returned to the Oregon Capitol after a multiday walkout to vote on an education tax proposal after Democrats agreed to drop a controversial vaccine proposal among other possible concessions.

Three Republicans appeared on the Senate floor Monday, giving the chamber enough members to conduct business.

Rep. Cheri Helt, the Republican from Bend who sponsored the vaccine measure, said Monday that the deal is a win for “the loudest, most extreme voices in our politics.”

The bill responds to a measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest that sickened more than 70 people. The outbreak was recently declared over but the national measles count has hit its highest in decades.

The proposal would have ended families’ ability to opt-out of school vaccination requirements for personal, philosophical or religious reasons.

Republicans shut down the Senate last week to protest a tax on businesses that’s expected to raise $2 billion for schools.

___

2:36 p.m.

A state lawmaker says Senate Democrats are willing to drop a controversial vaccine proposal to coax Republicans back to the Oregon capitol and vote on a multibillion school funding tax.

Rep. Cheri Helt, the Republican from Bend who sponsored the vaccine measure, said Monday that the deal is a win for “the loudest, most extreme voices in our politics.”

The bill responds to a measles outbreak in the Pacific Northwest that sickened more than 70 people. The outbreak was recently declared over but the national measles count has hit its highest in decades.

The proposal would have ended families’ ability to opt-out of school vaccination requirements for personal, philosophical or religious reasons.

Republicans shut down the Senate last week to protest a tax on businesses that’s expected to raise $2 billion for schools.

Copyright © 2019 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

 

Click to Read More and View Comments

Click to Hide