- The Washington Times - Friday, January 10, 2020

More than half of Americans surveyed said they feel their country is less safe following the U.S. airstrike that killed Iranian General Qasem Soleimani, a poll released Thursday found.

Conducted this week by Ipsos for USA Today, the survey asked respondents, “Has the killing of Soleimani and its immediate aftermath made the United States more safe or less safe?”

Among the roughly 1,005 adults surveyed, 55% said that they believe the U.S. is less safe than before Soleimani was killed. Comparatively, 24% said they feel safer, the poll found.


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In a separate question asked by Ipsos, Americans surveyed were asked if they agree with the sentiment that President Trump’s recent behavior toward Iran has been “reckless.” More than have of people polled – 52% – said they agreed, while only around one-third – 34% – disagreed, according to the pollster.

Soleimani, the leader of Iran’s elite Quds Force, was eliminated by a drone strike last Friday, Jan. 3, as his convoy traveled near Baghdad International Airport in Iraq.



Mr. Trump and U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo have subsequently stated that the strike was launched to prevent future attacks planned against U.S. interests.

Launched on the heels of an American contractor being killed in Iraq, the airstrike was followed by Iran taking credit for attacking two military bases housing U.S. troops Tuesday.

Mr. Pompeo has indicated since then that Iran is likely to blame for a Ukrainian passenger jet crashing near Tehran on Wednesday, killing all 176 people on board.

The House of Representatives voted Thursday evening to limit the Trump administration from taking military action against Iran unless authorized by Congress, meanwhile. That vote was largely along party lines, with just three Republicans voting for the measure, while eight Democrats bucked their House leadership to vote against it.

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