- The Washington Times - Thursday, January 9, 2020

The White House slammed a House resolution passed Thursday that would limit President Trump’s war fighting abilities in Iran, calling it a “misguided” measure that would undermine presidential authority.

Deputy Press Secretary Hogan Gidley said Mr. Trump has a “right and duty” to defend the nation from terrorism.

“That’s what he continues to do, and the world is safer for it,” he said. “This House resolution tries to undermine the ability of the U.S. Armed Forces to prevent terrorist activity by Iran and its proxies, and attempts to hinder the president’s authority to protect America and our interests in the region from the continued threats. These congressional actions are completely misguided.”


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The House resolution, which passed 224-194, mandates the White House “terminate the use of United States Armed Forces to engage in hostilities in or against Iran or any part of its government or military,” unless Mr. Trump receives Congressional approval or “to defend against an imminent armed attack upon the United States, its territories or possessions,” as allowed under the 1973 War Powers Resolution.

Majority Democrats put forward the measure in the wake of escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran.



Mr. Trump ordered a drone strike that killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani, resulting in retaliatory missile strikes that struck an Iraqi base housing American troops, though it resulted in no casualties.

Mr. Gidley slammed the resolution as “just another political move because, under well-established Supreme Court precedent, it’s non-binding and lacks the force of law.”

“President Trump’s decision to strike Qassem Soleimani, the world’s leading terrorist, was the right course of action and authorized under his constitutional powers as commander in chief and chief executive as well as the 2002 Authorization for Use of Military Force,” Mr. Gidley said.

• Lauren Meier contributed to this report.

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