- The Washington Times - Wednesday, May 27, 2020

A book with a notable comparison: “Trump and Churchill: Defenders of Western Civilization” by Nick Adams has just been published, sizing up the two high-profile, distinctive leaders who appear to have nothing in common. Both, however, upset the “prevailing politics” of their respective eras in similar fashion.

“Neither man made any effort to conceal his true self or conform to expectations. They were unapologetically authentic. Both, brimming with confidence, both loved their country. Both intensely disliked, even hated. Alpha males. Clear thinkers and plain speakers. Both prepared to stare down their enemies while standing up for their country. Both inspirational men who believed and openly espoused the power of dreaming and persistence,” writes Mr. Adams, the author of six other books.

Among many other things, he points out that Winston Churchill was 5-foot-6 while President Trump stands 6-foot-3, The former took daily naps in his pajamas while the latter sleeps very little. Neither made any effort to “conceal his true self,” the author says.

“Although it is primarily about President Trump and Prime Minister Churchill, this book is also about the American people, the English people, the world and the society we live in; therefore, it is part historical, part rallying cry, part sociological analysis, It’s written for everyone but with Middle America, the heartland voter, the blue collar Trump supporter in mind,” writes Mr. Adams.

“Nick Adams has written a useful book that puts the experience of the Trump presidency in a deeply historic and indeed civilizational light,” writes former House Speaker Newt Gingrich in the preface, calling the president a “strategic genius.”



The book was published by Post Hill Press, an independent publisher that counts talk radio host Dan Bongino and former White House advisor K.T. McFarland among its authors.

SOME AUTHENTIC GOP DIVERSITY

“Republicans have built the strongest, most diverse and most compelling class of recruits for Congress in recent memory, including more Republican women than ever before,” reports Calvin Moore, communication director for the Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC dedicated to winning a GOP majority in the U.S. House.

Which Republicans have filed to run for a House seat and help the party make that goal? Mr. Moore offers the numbers.

There are more than 200 women, 180 minority candidates and 250 veterans willing to go the distance, he says.

“And there are just 17 seats to take back the majority,” Mr. Moore adds.

THE CAUSE FOR A CAUSE

The environmental cause just took an interesting turn.

“Professors in academia are touting a new study that is being used to call for climate change to be added as a cause of death on death certificates,” writes Marc Morano, founder of Climate Depot, a news site which tracks alarmist reports and academic trends.

The research from the Australian National University Medical School was published this month in The Lancet Planetary Health.

“Climate change is a killer, but we don’t acknowledge it on death certificates,” the study authors noted.

“Death certification needs to be modernized, indirect causes should be reported, with all death certification prompting for external factors contributing to death, and these death data must be coupled with large-scale environmental datasets so that impact assessments can be done,” the authors wrote.

“Given the focus on COVID-19 infection rates and death tolls, it appears the climate activists in academia may want in on the scary and emotional death toll counts in order to draw attention back to their climate cause,” he explains.

KEEP YOUR EYE ON EVENTS

“Political activists often act and speak as if campaigns are won or lost by the mechanics of campaigning — who raised the most money, has the better ground game, better messaging or whatever. That approach feeds the delusion that candidates and their handlers are in control. In reality, politicians aren’t in control, they are controlled by events. Recognizing that distinction is essential to understanding what could happen in election 2020,” says veteran pollster Scott Rasmussen.

So what kind of events are we talking about here?

“This fall, if the economy is gaining traction and there is not a massive new coronavirus outbreak, President Trump will be reelected. If Democratic officials are seen as standing in the way of a successful reopening strategy, the president might even win a majority of the popular vote and expand his Electoral College margin. On the other hand, if there is a massive new wave of the pandemic, the president will be defeated. If President Trump is seen as recklessly pushing to reopen while voters are retreating to lockdown mode, he could face a defeat comparable to Herbert Hoover’s loss in the Great Depression,” predicts Mr. Rasmussen.

“I don’t know what will happen in the election, but I do know it will be determined by events outside the control of the campaigns,” he says.

FOXIFIED

Fox News Channel is now marking 20 straight weeks as the most-watched network in the entire cable realm, according to Nielsen Media Research. In prime time, Fox News had an average audience last week of 3.1 million viewers. MSNBC came in second with 1.8 million, followed by CNN (1.4 million), TLC (1,209,000) and HGTV (1,205,000).

As usual, host Sean Hannity enjoyed the largest audience of all — 4,047,000 viewers — closely followed by Tucker Carlson with 4,043,000. Both bested nearest MSNBC rival Rachel Maddow, who drew an average audience of 2.3 million.

POLL DU JOUR

• 68% of U.S. adults are currently working from home due to the coronavirus pandemic.

• 50% of this group would continue to work at home if they could “because they prefer it.”

• 26% say they would return to their office or workplace once businesses and schools reopen.

• 25% would return to the workplace once the pandemic subsides.

Source: A Gallup poll of 2,033 U.S. adults conducted May 11-17 and released Monday.

• Helpful information to [email protected]

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