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People walk next to a gas station flooded and damaged by the impact of Hurricane Maria, which hit the eastern region of the island, in Humacao, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, September 20, 2017. The strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in more than 80 years destroyed hundreds of homes, knocked out power across the entire island and turned some streets into raging rivers in an onslaught that could plunge the U.S. territory deeper into financial crisis. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

A stunned Puerto Rico seeks to rebuild after Hurricane Maria

- Associated Press

Tens of thousands of Puerto Ricans stunned by a hurricane that crushed concrete balconies, twisted metal gates and paralyzed the island with landslides, flooding and downed trees vowed to slowly rebuild amid an economic crisis as rescue crews fanned out across the U.S. territory Thursday.

A gate at the U.S. Oil Recovery Superfund site is shown Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, in Pasadena, Texas, where three tanks once used to store toxic waste were flooded during Hurricane Harvey. The Environmental Protection Agency says it has found no evidence that toxins washed off the site, but is still assessing damage.  (AP Photo)

Evidence of spills at toxic site during floods: AP exclusive report

- Associated Press

The U.S. government received reports of three spills at one of Houston’s dirtiest Superfund toxic waste sites in the days after the drenching rains from Hurricane Harvey finally stopped. Aerial photos reviewed by The Associated Press show dark-colored water surrounding the site as the floods receded, flowing through Vince Bayou and into the city’s ship channel.

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In this July 26, 2013, file photo, a motorist fills up with gasoline containing ethanol in Des Moines. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Push for summer gas to be sold year-round

- The Washington Times

In the wake of Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, the ethanol lobby has seized on the Trump administration's decision to prematurely lift a ban on summer sales of E15 gasoline — a move made to thwart potential gas shortages due to the two massive storms — as further proof the policy is outdated and should be scrapped by Congress.

In this GOES-16 geocolor image satellite image taken Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, the eye of Hurricane Irma, left, is just north of the island of Hispaniola, with Hurricane Jose, right, in the Atlantic Ocean. Irma, a fearsome Category 5 storm, cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving at least 10 dead and thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees on a track Thursday that could lead to a catastrophic strike on Florida. (NOAA via AP)

Hurricane Irma won't damage nuclear power plants, say officials

- The Washington Times

Two nuclear power plants stand directly in the path of Hurricane Irma, further complicating the government's efforts to prepare for the massive storm and leading state officials to say they'll shut the facilities down if the hurricane barrels down on south Florida as predicted.

President Donald Trump, with first lady Melania Trump with him, responds, "We'll see," as he is asked a question about attacking North Korea after the Trump's attended services at St. John's Church in Washington, Sunday, Sept. 3, 2017. The president last week named today a National Day of Prayer for victims of Hurricane Harvey. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) **FILE**

China, Brazil spark global trade war over biofuels

- The Washington Times

Throughout his campaign, President Trump voiced unwavering support for U.S. ethanol. Now that he's in the White House, industry leaders say it's time for Mr. Trump to back up his words with action by returning fire against Brazil and China in what increasingly looks like a global trade war over biofuels.