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Indian folk dancers rehearse before a billboard featuring Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, President Trump and first lady Melania Trump. (Associated Press)

India greets Trump with 14-mile motorcade

- The Washington Times

The news media is not particularly thrilled with the idea that President Trump’s first state visit to India is expected to be a joyous one. The coverage is rife with talk about optics and spectacle among journalists who can’t seem to get over the fact that the visit celebrates “shared values, and strategic and economic interests” between the two nations, according to the White House. The press is not thrilled that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has organized a mammoth, 14-mile motorcade for the occasion that has earned its own hashtag: #BiggestRoadShowEver.”

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Indian police detain members of Centre of Indian Trade Unions protesting against the visit of U.S. President Donald Trump to India, in Hyderabad, India, Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. India poured on the pageantry with a joyful, colorful welcome for President Donald Trump who on Monday kicked off a whirlwind 36-hour visit that emphasizes pageantry over policy and a mega-rally to reaffirm U.S.-India ties while providing enviable overseas imagery for a president in a re-election year. (AP Photo/Mahesh Kumar A.)

7 killed in New Delhi protests ahead of Trump's visit

- Associated Press

At least seven people, including a police officer, were killed and dozens were injured in clashes between hundreds of supporters and opponents of a new citizenship law in India that provides fast-track naturalization for some foreign-born religious minorities but not Muslims, police said Tuesday.

Malaysia's Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad waves after granted an audience with the Malaysia's King Sultan Abdullah Sultan Ahmad Shah at the National Palace in Kuala Lumpur, on Monday, Feb. 24, 2020. Mahathir has resigned as the Malaysia's 7th Prime Minister on Feb. 24, 2020. (AP Photo/FL Wong)

Race to form Malaysian gov't heats up, eyes on Mahathir

- Associated Press

After months of resisting pressure to hand over the premiership to his named successor, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad finally quit this week. But in a confounding twist, the 94-year-old leader emerged stronger than before, while his ruling alliance, which won a historic vote about two years ago, met its Waterloo.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper told Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman James Inhofe that he has no intention of decreasing the U.S. troop presence in Africa. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

U.S., South Korea at odds over Trump troop payment demand

- The Washington Times

U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper and South Korean counterpart Jeong Kyeong-doo acknowledged Monday they still have a lot of work to resolve a divisive dispute over the payments for the U.S. troops defending Seoul from North Korea on the divided Korean peninsula.

Activists with assault rifles stir fears at Nebraska Capitol

- Associated Press

Some Nebraska lawmakers expressed shock and outrage Monday that gun owners were allowed to bring loaded, semi-automatic rifles into the state Capitol to protest bills that would have imposed new restrictions on gun ownership.

FILE-In this Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019 file photoCourtney Parker votes on a new voting machine, in Dallas, Ga. Election integrity activists are raising concerns about Georgia's new voting machines, saying the large, bright, vertical touchscreens allow other people in the room to see a voter's selections in violation of ballot secrecy provisions in state law. In a petition filed Monday, Feb. 24, 2020, in Sumter County Superior Court against the five members of the county election board, the activists ask the court to order the board to have voters use hand-marked paper ballots rather than the touchscreen voting machines. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart, File)

Activists raise concerns about privacy of voting machines

- Associated Press

Election integrity activists are raising concerns about Georgia's new voting machines, saying the large, bright, vertical touchscreens allow other people in the room to see a voter's selections in violation of ballot secrecy provisions in state law.