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U.S.-Russia Crosstalk

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"Our military is [in Syria] to ensure Russia's interests in an important region of the world," said Russian President Vladimir Putin, responding to one of the screened questions selected from more than 2 million submitted by citizens. (Associated Press)

The Trump-Putin summit: What is the agenda?

It seems that U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin will finally meet for a formal summit in July, probably in Austria or another European country.

U.S. President Donald Trump (right) and Russia President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang on Nov. 11, 2017. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP) **FILE**

Is Trump-Putin summit still in the cards?

While the Trump-Kim summit is switching from on to off to on again, to many it may seem that under pressure from the Washington swamp and the media President Trump has effectively abandoned the idea of meeting with Vladimir Putin in the attempt to extricate both countries from the current mega-crisis.

In this Monday, Feb. 20, 2017 photo, traditional Russian nesting dolls depicting US President Donald Trump, center left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin are displayed for sale at a souvenir street shop in St.Petersburg, Russia. While their country has become a daily source of headlines and political intrigue in the United States, most Russians are watching the drama over President Donald Trump's relationship with Moscow with resignation, even indifference. Russian media, state-owned and private, chronicle Mr. Trump's troubles matter-of-factly. Regular citizens generally care little about them. Many share the view that what's unfolded in Washington has dimmed prospects for the mended Russia-U.S. ties his candidacy represented here and thus have lost interest. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, file)

The reality of Cold War 2.0

Politicians and experts still debate whether the United States and Russia are in a new cold war. Let's end the suspense. Cold War 2.0 is a reality.

In this Nov. 11, 2017 photo, U.S. President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang, Vietnam. Trump repeatedly declared in his presidential campaign that he would improve relations with Russia but was never specific. A year into his presidency, its no more clear. Moscow and Washington are at odds over issues ranging from North Korea to Ukraine, despite Trumps open admiration of Putin.  (Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP, File)

U.S.-Russian foreign and domestic enemies

Those who follow statements from the U.S. foreign policy establishment and mainstream media often hear that the main reason for the current crisis in U.S.-Russia relations has little to do with conventional geopolitics.

Red Square in Moscow

Normalize U.S.-Russia relations?

For half a century after the Second World War, the ever-present realization was that should the U.S.-Soviet rivalry ever get out of hand, a nuclear war would likely mean the end of both countries and, possibly, the end of human life itself.

Illustration on Reagan's unflagging state of effectiveness throughout his two terms as president by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Let Trump be Trump

It is common knowledge that the reason Ronald Reagan fired his first 1980 campaign manager John Sears was his loss to George H.W. Bush in the Iowa caucuses straw poll. Mr. Sears was replaced by William Casey, with Edwin Meese and Michael Deaver getting more involved in the campaign and all of them urging to let "Reagan to be Reagan."

President Trump attends his inaugural United Nations assembly.

North Korea and a New World Order

Let us honestly admit it. Despite the blistering rhetoric of President Trump, there are no good options to resolve the North Korean crisis. Even the traditional hawks who do not see any war they do not like this time are of the same opinion.

U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis, right, speaks with Lithuania's Minister of Defense Raimundas Karoblis prior to a military parade to celebrate Independence Day in Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

What is Trump doing in Ukraine?

I wrote an article three years ago that basically stated Ukraine was not our fight, no matter how much we want to support people who are fighting for freedom from Russia

Ukrainian soldiers march along main Khreshchatyk Street during a military parade to celebrate Independence Day in Kiev, Ukraine, Thursday, Aug. 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Ukrainian crisis: Is there a way out?

Are we preparing for the war with Russia over Ukraine? That's how it looks if you saw in the news how U.S. Marines regularly do simulated battles with Russian-speaking insurgents.