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U.S.-Russia Crosstalk

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In this Nov. 9, 2017, photo, U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping participate in a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China. Mr. Xi had an "extremely positive" phone conversation with Mr. Trump about trade and other issues, the foreign ministry said Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. The two leaders agreed to "strengthen economic exchanges," said a ministry spokesman, Lu Kang. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Trump is confronting China

There are some truths that I strive to preach, for lack of a better word, in today's information-culture wars propagated in our corrupt mainstream media. Here are a few: Nationalism is not racism, adherence to principles is not hate, masculinity is not toxic and there are only two sexes.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before departing for France on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

US-Russia-China Big Three - or WW III?

An expected meeting this weekend between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at a Paris commemoration of the end of World War I has been thrown into doubt, though a sideline encounter may still take place. A more substantive discussion between the men who control the world's biggest nuclear arsenals is expected at the G20 Buenos Aires summit later this month, when Mr. Trump will also meet with China's President Xi Jinping.

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton, left, and Russian Security Council chairman Nikolai Patrushev talk prior their official talks in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Bolton met with Patrushev to discuss a broad range of issues including arms control agreements, Syria, Iran, North Korea and the fight against terrorism.(Press Service of the Russian Security Council via AP)

Why stay in a nuclear treaty the other side ignores?

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton is visiting Moscow this week to meet with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Russian National Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev. It is reported that a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin could also be in the works.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov smiles as he speaks to Madagascar's Foreign Minister Eloi Maxime Alphonse Dovo during their meeting in Moscow, Russia, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. Lavrov will meet with U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton for high-tension talks in Moscow, after President Donald Trump announced his intention to withdraw from a landmark nuclear weapons treaty. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

Bolton in Moscow on whose agenda?

National Security Adviser John Bolton is scheduled to meet with his Russian counterpart, Nikolai Patrushev, and other senior officials, including Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov in Moscow.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani speaks during a news conference, Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

It's all about Iran

For the Trump administration, it's not about Syria in the Middle East, or even Russia; it's about Iran, and only Iran.

Syria's United Nations Ambassador Bashar Jaafari, center, listens as President Donald Trump address the United Nations General Assembly, Tuesday Sept. 25, 2018 at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

U.S., Russia play 'chicken' in Syria

During the past six months, the U.S. and Russia came close at least three times to a direct military clash in Syria with unpredictable consequences, including possible use of nuclear weapons. Each time unthinkable disaster was avoided at the last minute, but no one knows if we will be lucky again the next time.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., left, and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, pose questions to witnesses as the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations holds a hearing on relations between the U.S. and Russia, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

'Sanctions bill from hell'

Upcoming discussion of crushing new anti-Russia legislation that Sen. Lindsey Graham calls "the sanctions bill from hell" will show if there are any sober-minded members of Congress still left on Capitol Hill.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin, right, shake hand at the beginning of a meeting at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland, Monday, July 16, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Helsinki summit: What's next?

Ever since the Helsinki summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin, the mainstream-corporate media, well-known Democrats and many highly placed Republicans have been in full-tilt lather against Mr. Trump.

"Our military is [in Syria] to ensure Russia's interests in an important region of the world," said Russian President Vladimir Putin, responding to one of the screened questions selected from more than 2 million submitted by citizens. (Associated Press)

The Trump-Putin summit: What is the agenda?

It seems that U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin will finally meet for a formal summit in July, probably in Austria or another European country.

U.S. President Donald Trump (right) and Russia President Vladimir Putin talk during the family photo session at the APEC Summit in Danang on Nov. 11, 2017. (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP) **FILE**

Is Trump-Putin summit still in the cards?

While the Trump-Kim summit is switching from on to off to on again, to many it may seem that under pressure from the Washington swamp and the media President Trump has effectively abandoned the idea of meeting with Vladimir Putin in the attempt to extricate both countries from the current mega-crisis.

In this Monday, Feb. 20, 2017 photo, traditional Russian nesting dolls depicting US President Donald Trump, center left, and Russian President Vladimir Putin are displayed for sale at a souvenir street shop in St.Petersburg, Russia. While their country has become a daily source of headlines and political intrigue in the United States, most Russians are watching the drama over President Donald Trump's relationship with Moscow with resignation, even indifference. Russian media, state-owned and private, chronicle Mr. Trump's troubles matter-of-factly. Regular citizens generally care little about them. Many share the view that what's unfolded in Washington has dimmed prospects for the mended Russia-U.S. ties his candidacy represented here and thus have lost interest. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, file)

The reality of Cold War 2.0

Politicians and experts still debate whether the United States and Russia are in a new cold war. Let's end the suspense. Cold War 2.0 is a reality.