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Rebecca Hagelin

The ‘holiday’ is Christmas

Just as the Jewish people and so many gentiles missed the true Jesus at the time of his life on earth, America as a “Christian nation” misses Jesus today.

Cutting Through Obama Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s year in review

On Thanksgiving Day, President Trump took to Twitter to remind Americans how much they had to be thankful for during his first year in office, citing a soaring stock market, a “record” cut in regulations, and the “lowest unemployment in 17 years.” Was the president’s self-issued report card accurate?

Illustration of the Mississippi Gopher Frog by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘The Case of the Missing Frog’

Sherlock Holmes it isn’t. But Weyerhaeuser v. United States Fish and Wildlife Service, a case seeking review by the Supreme Court, could be called, “The Case of the Missing Frog.” In this amphibian equivalent of an Arthur Conan Doyle mystery, the government seeks to seize control of land it does not own, to protect an endangered species of frog that does not live there, force private landowners to tear down a healthy native forest, and install at landowner expense a new forest the landowner does not want.

Mirror Tax Cut Plans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What John F. Kennedy and Donald Trump have in common

Last week during an address at the White House President Trump likened his tax plan to “the tax cut that John F. Kennedy proposed 55 years ago.” This elicited some howls of protest from Mr. Trump’s liberal critics who say it’s historically inaccurate to compare the Trump plan to JFK’s.

Illustration on the hopes generated by Christmas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Always winter but never Christmas

In C.S. Lewis’ “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe,” there is a scene where we find the children standing fearful and confused in a land that is frozen and nearly lifeless. A lamppost stands somberly in a windless forest that is blanketed with snow and the few creatures the children do encounter are frightened and paranoid.

Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

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Jerusalem move a win for democracy

The Second Intifada, started in 2000, saw the murder of 1,000 Israelis and the self-defense killing of 3,000 Arab terrorists attempting to butcher Israeli civilians. PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat planned the intifada before going to Camp David to meet President Bill Clinton and then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Though they got everything they claimed they wanted (to the West, anyway), Arafat feared that signing an 'end-of-conflict clause' would lead to his death. So he went home and launched his suicide bombers.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters as he departs from the South Lawn of the White House via Marine One in Washington, Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017, to spend the weekend at Camp David in Maryland. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Who's in charge of the military?

Perhaps it's the mark of our times, but everybody seems to want to be someone or something he's not. Men are trying to be women, women want to be soldiers, judges appoint themselves legislators. "Amusin,'" as Li'l Abner used to say in the comics pages, "but confusin'." But given the stakes, there's no room for the confusing.

FILE - This file photo provided on Monday, Sept 25, 2017, by the Ghouta Media Center, a Syrian activist media group, shows smoke and debris rising after Syrian government shelling of the rebel-held Jobar neighborhood of Damascus, Syria. Humanitarian officials are warning that conditions outside Syria's capital have reached crisis levels, as the government refuses to give up a siege against its opponents that has trapped close to 400,000 people without enough food, fuel or medicine for the winter. (Ghouta Media Center, via AP, File)

The season for church-burning

The "soldiers" of ISIS are battered, bloody and on the run in Iraq, but they're making with big talk for the holidays which they have no reluctance to call by their right name, "the Christmas season."

'Gifts' of the left

The denizens of the "swamp," who have become known to us as the "deep state," are apparently sincere in their belief that the American voters have put our nation in extreme jeopardy by rejecting the progressive, socialist policies of the political left. These bureaucrats, hired or appointed by previous administrations, are supported and encouraged by a few elected officials from deeply "blue" areas. Their stated determination is to save our country from the constitutionally elected administration currently in place.

Baker within rights to deny service

It seems like baking a cake has never been more decisive. The Supreme Court's coming decision concerning a bakery owner who refused to bake a cake for a homosexual couple's wedding is at its core about the baker's religious beliefs. Thus, the expected decision will have widespread consequences — not just in our understanding of freedom of religion, but also in how we conduct business in this nation.

The last Republicans, at least for now

The title of the new book by historian Mark K. Updegrove, "The Last Republicans," about presidents George H.W. Bush (41) and George W. Bush (43) is in and of itself intriguing.

People pass by the set of Today Show during the broadcast Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, in New York. NBC News says longtime "Today" show host Matt Lauer has been fired for "inappropriate sexual behavior." Co-host Savannah Guthrie made the announcement at the top of Wednesday's show.  (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

An adulterous affair with a boss is not sexual harassment

- The Washington Times

Addie Zinone, a former production assistant for the "Today Show," has come forward to say she and Matt Lauer engaged in a consensual sexual encounter in the 2000 time frame -- but that she was a victim of his sexually harassing nature just the same. Maybe. But let's be clear. Adultery is not the same as sexual harassment.

Bangladeshi Catholic nuns greet Pope Francis during his visit to Church of the Holy Rosary in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017. Pope Francis is wrapping up his Asian trip with a visit to an orphanage and home for the disabled run by Mother Teresa's order and a meeting with Bangladeshi priests and nuns. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

Catholic Church pressed to lift celibacy, dime out confessing abusers

- The Washington Times

The Catholic Church, as everybody knows, has a problem with its priests preying on little children, and with its higher-ups covering up the sexual abuse scandals. So a new report in Australia is recommending the church lift its celibacy requirements for the diocesan clergy -- the idea being that if these members of the church could have sex with, say, wives, they wouldn't be chasing after the choir boys. This makes practical sense.

British author J.K. Rowling poses for photographers at the Southbank Centre in London, Sept. 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis) ** FILE **

J.K. Rowling, 'Harry Potter' fame: God is a black woman

- The Washington Times

J.K. Rowling, the author of the "Harry Potter" series that was made into several movies, weighed in on the Alabama Senate election to say that Roy Moore, who spoke of how God was in control during his explanation to supporters about his refusal to concede, was indeed correct -- God was definitely in control. It was her next statement that raises eyebrows. Rowling, in a tweet, added: "What [Moore] didn't realise was, She's black."