Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the end of Net Neutrality regulations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Network neutrality comes to an end

They finally did it. After six months of debate, during which it received over 23 million public comments (of which half may have been fraudulent), the Federal Communications Commission voted on Dec. 14 to eliminate the network neutrality rules it imposed on broadband network operators during the Obama era.

Illustration on Hanukkah by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hanukkah, the first battle against transnationalism

Many think of Hanukkah as a fight for religious freedom. While religious freedom was at stake, it was part of a broader battle in behalf of the concept of national identity. The Maccabees, local Judeans who spearheaded the revolt against the overpowering northern Syrian Greeks, and who inspired the grass-roots, did so for the overarching cause of retaining Judea’s identity and Jewish character, which was under assault by those trying to denude Judea of its distinctiveness.

Illustration on global harmony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

People, planet and climate working together

Another year of weather is coming to a close. Even with some record-breaking snowfall from this past weekend’s storm in the eastern U.S., in many ways weather this year was not much different from any other year since the regular recording of temperature, precipitation and wind began across much of the globe 150 years ago.

Trump Administration Record on School Choice Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping his promise about school choice

During the 2016 presidential campaign, candidate Donald Trump spoke passionately and often about school choice. Some school choice advocates, however, are beginning to rumble about the lack of progress on this key domestic policy promise. This grumbling has been building for some time among “talking heads” in the think-tank world.

Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off the stage with wife Kayla Moore after he spoke to supporters after an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

What Roy Moore’s defeat portends

There were plenty of reasons why Republican Roy Moore’s defeat in the scandal-plagued Alabama election was a blessing for the GOP, despite losing a seat in a closely divided Senate.

Illustration on the GOP and the death penalty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Republicans reconsidering the death penalty

The mere idea of Republicans sponsoring death penalty repeal bills in great numbers was once considered an unlikely notion. However, Conservatives Concerned about the Death Penalty recently released a report revealing how Republicans are championing measures to end capital punishment at never-before-seen rates.

Doug Jones is greeted by a supporter before speaking during an election-night watch party Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala. Jones has defeated Republican Roy Moore, a one-time GOP pariah who was embraced by the Republican Party and the president even after facing allegations of sexual impropriety. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Doug Jones — and Trump’s life just got a lot harder

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has been beating a dead horse in Congress for almost a year now, trying to pass his agendas legislatively through a Senate that’s dominated by Republicans yet consistently falls to Democratic Party will because of an ever-looming threat of filibuster. It’s only going to get tougher for Trump. Prepare for the stalled and even dropped legislation.

Illustration on Iranian influence in the Persian Gulf region by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s indirect strategy for regional influence

Last month, Yemen’s Houthis, the Iranian-supported rebel faction that now dominates the southern Persian Gulf’s most volatile state, fired a ballistic missile that came close to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, before being intercepted by the country’s military. The incident was a clear sign of the deepening sectarian conflict between Tehran and Riyadh now taking place throughout the Middle East. But it was also an accurate reflection of the sort of asymmetric tactics being prioritized by Iran in its strategy for regional dominance.

An open process for revamping net neutrality

While the pall of scandals and alleged scandals in the nation’s capital may have many voters thinking of the Beltway as a dysfunctional wasteland, the reality is that much of the machinery of government is, in fact, going full throttle trying to create jobs and spur growth. Only you wouldn’t know it from the daily news cycle.

Invisible Political Hand Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The invisible hand of economics

The invisible hand of American presidential politics is economics. Almost imperceptibly guiding the electorate, no other issue is as determinant of a presidency’s success. Currently, it is supporting Donald Trump through his political problems and could push him to re-election, as it has so many others.

In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Related Articles

Bangladeshi Catholic nuns greet Pope Francis during his visit to Church of the Holy Rosary in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017. Pope Francis is wrapping up his Asian trip with a visit to an orphanage and home for the disabled run by Mother Teresa's order and a meeting with Bangladeshi priests and nuns. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi)

Catholic Church pressed to lift celibacy, dime out confessing abusers

- The Washington Times

The Catholic Church, as everybody knows, has a problem with its priests preying on little children, and with its higher-ups covering up the sexual abuse scandals. So a new report in Australia is recommending the church lift its celibacy requirements for the diocesan clergy -- the idea being that if these members of the church could have sex with, say, wives, they wouldn't be chasing after the choir boys. This makes practical sense.

British author J.K. Rowling poses for photographers at the Southbank Centre in London, Sept. 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis) ** FILE **

J.K. Rowling, 'Harry Potter' fame: God is a black woman

- The Washington Times

J.K. Rowling, the author of the "Harry Potter" series that was made into several movies, weighed in on the Alabama Senate election to say that Roy Moore, who spoke of how God was in control during his explanation to supporters about his refusal to concede, was indeed correct -- God was definitely in control. It was her next statement that raises eyebrows. Rowling, in a tweet, added: "What [Moore] didn't realise was, She's black."

Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Acting Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Administrator Robert Patterson make an announcement about new tools to combat the opioid crises, at the Justice Department in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Trading a badge for a broom

Everyone is entitled to an opinion. Those tasked with administering the law are obligated defer their opinions to the impartiality of the Constitution. Some people at the Justice Department prefer to tug on Lady Justice's blindfold. Mr. Mueller's investigation into Russian collusion, so called, casting a shadow over the administration of Donald Trump since Inauguration Day, is fraying badly at the edges. The badge, the symbol of authority, must give way to the broom.

A risky president for Mexico

The course of American-Mexican relations never has run particularly smooth. There was the Mexican-American war in the mid-19th century, of course, and there's always the inherent tension with one big, rich country to the north sharing a lengthy border with a poor, perennially corrupt and struggling nation to the south. "Poor Mexico," goes one ancient lament south of the border, "so far from God, so close to the United States."

Trump allegations nonsense

The resurrection of stale, unsubstantiated sexual-harassment allegations are just the latest attempt to drive President Trump from office. Mr. Trump's resignation has been called for and demands have been made for an investigation. But there is nothing to investigate. There is merely a desire for smear campaign employing rehashed stories.

Tax meat, dairy for better health?

With the annual tax-filing date just around the corner, pundits are searching for ways to make our tax code fairer and more reflective of our social incentives and burdens. In this regard, there is a growing interest in a tax on meat, eggs and dairy products designed to curb the self-destructive health impacts of the consumption of fatty animal-derived items and effectively compensate society for the associated, devastating environmental impacts.

Undercover in the seedy world of 'pill mills'

In veteran crime writer Michael Connelly's previous novel, "The Late Show," he introduced readers to a new character, Renee Ballard, an LAPD detective working the night shift.

Illustration on changing mores of love and sex by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why we can't let the creeps write the rules

Maybe we need a fresh perspective. Everybody regards harassers as creeps. We're watching them fall on their swords of necessity and regret, as much for being caught for what they've actually done. Some of the rest of us, however, are acting a little too much like Madame Defarge in Charles Dickens' "A Tale of Two Cities," knitting with contented delight as the heads of the guilty and innocent drop from the guillotine.