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FILE - In this April 21, 2018 file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." North Korea's abrupt diplomatic outreach in recent months comes after a flurry of weapons tests that marked 2017, including the underground detonation of an alleged thermonuclear warhead and three launches of developmental ICBMs designed to strike the U.S. mainland. Inter-Korean dialogue resumed after Kim in his New Years speech proposed talks with the South to reduce animosities and for the North to participate in Februarys Winter Olympics in Pyongchang. North Korea sent hundreds of people to the games, including Kim's sister, who expressed her brother's desire to meet with Moon for a summit. South Korean officials later brokered a potential summit between Kim and Trump.  (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Mike Pompeo. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democratic terror of a miracle in North Korea

- The Washington Times

Trying to spark a new romance, or even arrange a weekend tryst, is not always easy. It’s impossible with the help of spectators eager to throw things, not orange blossoms but sticks and stones with sharp edges. But that’s how Washington tries to conduct diplomacy, circa 2018.

Illustration on Taiwan's contributions to world health by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why Taiwan must be seated at the World Health Assembly

The constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) notes that “the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition.” Yet WHO withheld, as last year, an invitation for Taiwan’s participation in May as an observer in the annual World Health Assembly (WHA) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Sale of Unmanned Aerial Systems to Our Allies Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A win for America and its allies

Our allies and partners want to “buy American.” They know U.S. industries produce the most technologically sophisticated and effective defense systems in the world. When our allies and partners are better equipped to defend themselves, there is greater regional peace and stability — and far less need for American service members to be in harm’s way.

Like Trolls to the Flame Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the patent system stronger

Appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week, the new director of the Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), Andrei Iancu, stressed his office’s focus on enhancing innovation through a strong, reliable and predictable patent ecosystem. All of us want a system that supports innovation by maximizing patent quality and minimizing patent granting mistakes. But how?

Illustration on fiscal responsibility and spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Budget blame where it belongs

While tax cuts take the budget blame, spending does the debt damage. Proponents of big government spending are happy to stoke the latest story in the narrative that America is under-taxed.

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Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Samantha Mayor lights a candle during the Yom HaShoah candle lighting ceremony, Sunday, April 15, 2018, at the Downtown Jewish Center Chabad Education Center, in Fort Lauderdale as her parents Ellyn and Jesse help. The ceremony remembers victims of the holocaust and she also lit 17 candles for the victims of the Parkland school shooting. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

What led to the Broward County rampage

- The Washington Times

As the orchestrated outrage over the February shootings at Florida's Parkland high school dies down, it's time to look at what really led to the rampage during which Nikolas Cruz gunned down and killed 17 Margery Stoneman Douglas students.

Media Casting Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Abolishing campaign contribution limits

- The Washington Times

President Trump and Amazon's Jeff Bezos dislike each other. The Washington Post, owned by Mr. Bezos, runs many stories each day attacking the president. Some are fair and about real issues. But many are petty or just plain wrong. Even The Post's alleged "conservative" writers appear to have a weekly quota of "why Donald Trump is awful" stories.

In this April 13, 2017 file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and Choe Ryong Hae, vice-chairman of the central committee of the Workers' Party, arrive for the official opening of the Ryomyong residential area, in Pyongyang, North Korea. While North Korea declared this past weekend it would stop nuclear and intercontinental ballistic missile tests and shut down its nuclear test site, it did not indicate it will give up its nuclear arsenal or halt its production of missiles. Moon and later President Donald Trump are still likely to find it very difficult to persuade Kim to dismantle his entire arsenal, which includes purported thermonuclear weapons and developmental ICBMs.(AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

Neutralizing a nuclear-armed North Korea

- The Washington Times

Throughout my latest visit to Northeast Asia, I've met with many governmental officials, business leaders, academics and activists, and seen firsthand that the people of Japan, Taiwan and South Korea are eagerly anticipating the upcoming summits with Kim Jong-un, North Korea's reclusive and dictatorial leader.

Another hurdle cleared

Abad novelist couldn't make this up: American politicians who pretended to sing only from the hymnbook of peace now want to spoil the best opportunity in three generations to pacify the warmongers of North Korea, and turn back the tide of nuclear proliferation which threatens us all. Their fuzzy rationale is that the mover of the promising breakthrough is Donald Trump, and the imperative of his enemies to destroy his presidency must come first. Seldom have political differences become so untethered from the reality of the common good.

Confirm Pompeo

That Mike Pompeo may have a problem being confirmed as secretary of State is another example of the usual obstruction by Democrats and the persistent nonsense exhibited by some Republicans.

Improve NATO forces now

President Trump has asked Europe's allies to pay their fair share of defense costs, and started efforts to rebuild Europe's military readiness as NATO is standing up, lethal military aid is going to Ukraine and U.S. energy is going to Europe as an alternative to Gazprom.

A modern take on the 'cowboy mythos'

I first became acquainted with Craig Johnson's fictional modern-day Western sheriff by watching the TV series "Longmire," which is based on Mr. Johnson's novels. (The show first appeared on A&E and is now on Netflix). I liked the Walt Longmire character and the rural crime stories, so I began reading the books. With most crime dramas set in New York, Los Angeles and other major cities, it is refreshing that Mr. Johnson's novels are set in the fictitious Absarka County of Wyoming.

In this Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018, file photo, Chris Carter holds the Lininger's family Bible in Omaha, Neb. (Julia Nagy/Omaha World-Herald via AP)

GQ strikes 'foolish' Bible from should-read list

- The Washington Times

The editors of GQ magazine, in all their literary acumen, struck the Bible from its recently assembled "21 Books You Don't Have to Read" list. Good thing they didn't list the Koran. Mocking Christians is fairly safe business. Mock the wrong Muslim and bam, there goes your head.