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Thinking Differently Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A fresh wind in the Middle East

For decades Saudi leaders expressed in vituperative fashion an animus to the state of Israel as an illegal entity in what is assumed to be Arab land. While King Salman reaffirmed a steadfast position on the Palestinian issue and the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people to Jerusalem as their capital, he made an astonishing claim that the Jewish people have a right to a “nation state in at least part of their ancestral home.” On its face this may not seem as much, but based on commentary over the last 70 years this comment is extraordinary.

Illustration on copyright protection by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Copyrights and patents, piracy and theft

April 26 is World Intellectual Property Day — a day too little-noticed in most quarters but which shouldn’t be.

In this April 21, 2018, file photo, people watch a TV screen showing an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un during a news program at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The signs read: "North Korea says it has suspended nuclear tests." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

A summit imperiled by Rocket Man’s travel tribulations

- The Washington Times

“Just getting there, as Cunard once boasted of transatlantic crossings by ship, “is half the fun.” The Atlantic is still there, but ocean liners are not, and almost the only way to cross the ocean sea now is by air. That’s no fun at all. Dining aboard an ocean liner has been replaced by dining aloft, and you’re lucky to get a pretzel or a stale cracker.

Illustration on the Syrian situation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What’s next in Syria

Western civilization — in the guise of its three leading powers — struck back at international lawlessness when they hit Syrian chemical sites on April 13. It remains to be seen whether the strike had the desired effect of deterring the Syrian leadership from the further use of such weapons. If it does, President Trump’s claim of “mission accomplished” will be justified. That brings up the key question of “what next?” if chemical weapons use continues.

Apprenticeship Programs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Over-investing in higher education

After decades worrying about a shortage of good-paying jobs, America has too many — manufacturing, construction and increasingly service businesses can’t find the qualified workers needed to expand. This is a significant barrier to permanently restoring 3 percent to 4 percent growth so that the nation can meet the needs of an aging population, finance its commitments to defend freedom — through our military and costly instruments of soft power — and invest in infrastructure and R&D without becoming dangerously indebted.

A first step for health reform

It’s beginning to look like the Republicans have pretty much abandoned their promise to “repeal and replace” Obamacare. Considering they don’t have the votes to do it this does not come as a big surprise. If they want to remain in power though, they have to come up with something.

Targeting Handguns Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The left’s war on self-defense

In Arizona, there is a special election to replace Rep. Trent Franks, who resigned earlier this year. Making special appearances to help the Democrat in that race are the kids from Parkland, Florida.

Illustration on Kim Jong-un's diplomatic wish list by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Kim Jong-un really wants

If one were to make a list of “what Kim really wants” in his discussions with the U.S., such would be quite straightforward, however — at least so far — they have not been expressed as such.

Related Articles

Liberal Media on Cable Television Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The angry left and its adversaries

Has it been noted that the country's political disagreements are becoming increasingly violent? About 15 years ago "the angry left" appeared on the scene, and its indignant members got a lot of attention from the media. The enormous volume of press attention signaled the media's manifest approval, if sotto voce. Next came the Occupiers' movement, and again these ruffians came with the media's approval, at least sotto voce. Then gun-toting cowards began shooting people for humanitarian reasons, and the media did not know what to think. The assassination attempt on House Majority Whip Steve Scalise and his colleagues comes to mind.

FDR underused quotas

An official of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum claims that "deep anti-Semitism" among the American public in the 1930s was to blame for the fact that America's immigration quotas were never filled, even as hundreds of thousands of Jewish refugees were fleeing Nazi Germany ("U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum opens exhibition on American response to Nazism," Web, April 22).

Tillman death still in vain

Last weekend marked the 14th anniversary of the friendly fire killing of Cpl. Pat Tillman, a football hero and man of honor who gave up millions of dollars in potential earnings to serve his country.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron embrace at the conclusion of a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, April 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

France remembers

Donald Trump's romance with Emmanuel Macron continued to blossom Tuesday when they planted a tree together on the White House lawn. The French president brought the sapling, a cutting from the European Sessile oak, with him from Paris.

This Tuesday, March 14, 2017, photo shows the Starbucks logo on a shop in downtown Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

Starbucks' other problem

- The Washington Times

Starbucks has a latte work to do to catch up with the competition when it comes to getting its drive-thru customers back on the road quickly.

Sex robots, bringing dysfunction to a community near you

- The Washington Times

For less than $2,000, men the world over can order and have shipped their very own handmade woman -- their very own artificially intelligence-responding, machine-programmed moving, software-generated moaning portable flesh-like robotic sex doll. Yep. They have to leave their dignity at the door, of course.