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In this Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally in Berkeley, Calif. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson, file)

Drain the education swamp: College students’ tyrannical behavior must be stopped

How many conversations have we had with our friends, family and co-workers wondering what happened to the millennials? We expect a new generation to have new ideas and new ways of approaching the world. So how do we explain when a new generation is steeped in bullying, complaining about hurt feelings, demanding “safe spaces,” and using pride in fragile egos and weakened emotional states as the excuse to condemn free speech?

Illustration on China's role in diffusing the North Korean nuclear threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Nobody’s fool over North Korean nukes

Our news-hack kids — or, as Obama chief spinner Ben Rhodes called them, the “27-year-old know-nothings” — don’t have a clue as to the operative history of the North Korean nuclear threat to Asia, the Pacific and the United States.

Illustration on lawsuits harassing energy producers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Energy producers’ uphill battle against wealthy environmentalists

American manufacturing has been undergoing a tough transition for decades. Import competition and currency manipulation by other countries as well as regulatory excess at home have all taken a toll in many sectors of manufacturing. Just as manufacturing in America appears to be coming back, it faces a formidable new threat: a cabal of activists, cunning lawyers, ambitious politicians and a network of well-heeled benefactors.

Removing Government Intervention Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting American business abroad

Westerners applaud the actions of the Trump administration to end the war on the West waged by the Obama administration, including: President Trump’s efforts to revitalize energy production from federal lands — oil and gas and coal; his dispatch of the Environmental Protection Agency’s land-grabbing “waters of the United States” rule; and his order to revoke, roll back or revise the national monument decrees with which President Obama placed millions of acres of federal lands off-limits to economic and recreational uses.

Secure Air Traffic Control Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Privatization with a potential for danger

Relieving the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) of its oversight of our nation’s air traffic control (ATC) operations would create significant concerns in both military and homeland security air defense mission areas. House Transportation Committee Chairman Bill Schuster has advocated relentlessly for ATC privatization, drafting and promoting two separate bills outlining the move to privatized control of the busiest airspace in the world. Endorsed by the Trump administration, this move has repercussions beyond the inherent conflict of interest presented by a commercial airline governing board.

Illustration on the changing attitudes toward good and evil in Star Wars by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Choosing favorites in ‘Star Wars’

On May 25, 1977, the original “Star Wars” movie, “A New Hope,” made its debut. It immediately had an impact that is hard to measure, especially on the generation that would, unfortunately, be called “X,” itself a seemingly sci-fi moniker.

Illustration on the growing threat of nuclear crisis with North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Discounting the North Korea threat countdown

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster, speaking to the Reagan National Defense Forum on Dec. 2, offered up a doomsday prediction. When asked how close the United States and North Korea are to war, Mr. McMaster replied, “It’s increasing every day.” Sen. Jim Inhofe, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, seconded that statement in even more distressing language: “It is important for us here in the Senate to communicate to the American people the credible, grave, and immediate threat that we face . We don’t have the luxury of time.”

A detail of the baby Jesus is seen in a Nativity scene in the East Room during a media preview of the 2017 holiday decorations at the White House in Washington, Monday, Nov. 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Colleges push hard for Christ-free Christmases

- The Washington Times

College administrators around the country, it seems, are rushing to acquiesce to even the most minor of voices on campuses to make sure the “C” word — that’s “C” for Christmas, shhh! — doesn’t cause angst in some offended student’s ears. Basically, they’re driving hard to drive out the reason for the season, Jesus Christ.

Illustration on The Washington Post's treatment of Judge Roy Moore by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Molested by the media

You don’t have to be a fan of Alabama’s Republican senatorial nominee Roy Moore to see that the Furies in the media aren’t willing to cut him a break even when his most lethal accusers have been caught falsifying the record. The late Charles Manson seems to have gotten a more sympathetic press. For the past two months, the “Never Moore” media have tried to sink the judge by insisting his dating of teenage girls when he was in his 30s was scandalous on its face, even when they were of age, their mothers approved and the women themselves conceded he never engaged in sexual misconduct.

Illustration on Roy Moore's run for the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Roy Moore and the politics of winning

It now looks as if Roy Moore, the Republican candidate for the Senate in Alabama, will win his race, despite the publicity about his alleged improper behavior with a 14-year-old girl 38 years ago, and maybe others young girls as well.

FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, labor union members and supporters rally for better wages in New York. Nearly 2 million New York workers are unionized. New York's powerful labor unions are lining up against a constitutional convention, warning voters that opening up the state's main governing document could lead to the erosion of worker protections and rights such as collective bargaining. In November 2017, New Yorkers will be asked whether to hold a convention, where delegates would consider big changes to the constitution. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

Reining in the worker center end run

Is it the beginning of the end for Big Labor’s henchmen? You’d be forgiven if you think I’m referring to the Hoffas. I’m actually talking about so-called worker centers, which have recently been the labor movement’s bludgeon — all while avoiding federal rules on union transparency and conduct.

Illustration on the risks of the Middle-East peace process by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good Luck, Jared Kushner

Jared Kushner, President Trump’s son-in-law, and Jason Greenblatt, formerly one of the president’s real estate lawyers, are pursuing what the president calls the “ultimate deal,” a peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. We should wish them luck because they’re going to need it.

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President Donald Trump shakes hands with French President Emmanuel Macron during a meeting at the U.S. Embassy, Thursday, May 25, 2017, in Brussels. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The ambassador tweets his mind, not unlike...

- The Washington Times

Some high-ranking Republicans told me they briefly considered snubbing a French Embassy Christmas party Wednesday after Amb. Gerard Araud tweeted -- then quickly deleted - an accurate but ill-timed observation about U.S. history.

In this Jan. 28, 2016, file photo, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee walks onto the stage before a Republican presidential primary debate in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

Mike Huckabee on non-conceding Roy Moore: 'Best to exit with class'

- The Washington Times

Mike Huckabee, former Arkansas governor and presidential hopeful, sent a pretty blunt message Roy Moore's way Wednesday, telling the failed Senate candidate it was well past time to concede. "Roy Moore won't concede; says will wait on God to speak," Huckabee tweeted. "God wasn't registered to vote in AL but the ppl who voted did speak and it wasn't close enough for recount." Quite right.

In this July 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks about health care in the Blue Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Trump's right -- by the numbers, media hate him

- The Washington Times

A new study showed that in September, October and November, almost 91 percent of remarks from reporters' and other so-called non-partisan-types' mouths during evening ABC, NBC and CBS broadcasts were anti-Trump in nature. Ninety-one percent. That's pretty dang significant. That's an outright media blitz -- a war even.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at the end of an election-night watch party at the RSA activity center, Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, in Montgomery, Ala. Moore didn't concede the election to Democrat Doug Jones. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Roy Moore loss not a commentary on Donald Trump

- The Washington Times

Roy Moore may have denied all the sexual misconduct and harassment charges that plagued his long and dark campaign -- but apparently, voters couldn't move past the shadows, and Democrat Doug Jones won. Democrats are no doubt poised to spin the Moore loss as some sort of stunning commentary on President Donald Trump. But that'd be folly.

The revolution eats its own

As I ponder the lengthening list of alleged sexual offenders drawn from Hollywood, the arts, the media and politics, I am moved to wonder why the overwhelming majority of the accused are prominent luminaries of the left. Those accused on the right claim utter innocence, including Bill O'Reilly, who nonetheless paid out a fortune to accusers — go "figah," as they say in Brooklyn. At any rate, the lefties constitute the growing multitude.

Illustration on the Mueller investigation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When Trump associates won't 'co-operate'

- The Washington Times

Robert Mueller, like virtually every special prosecutor or independent counsel preceding him, has embarked on what amounts to a witch hunt that will allow him to brag when it's over that he indicted a bunch of those he went after — even if he never manages to unearth any evidence that the Trump campaign "colluded" with the Russians.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017 file photo, flames sweep up a steep canyon wall, threatening homes on a ridge line as the Skirball wildfire swept through the Bel Air district of Los Angeles. The Los Angeles Fire Department said Tuesday, Dec. 12, 2017, that the wildfire that destroyed six homes and damaged a dozen more last week in the exclusive Bel Air section of Los Angeles was sparked by an illegal cooking fire in a homeless encampment. No one was in the camp, and no arrests have been made. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)

Feeling the burn in California

There's never a dull moment in California. Almost a universe unto itself, the westernmost continental state has something for every lifestyle, American or otherwise. But its 40 million inhabitants have to contend with nature like no other state, a point driven home by the late-autumn outbreak of killer wildfires. The treasure that is California comes with considerable added peril when fire joins earthquake.

FILE - In this June 8, 2017 file photo Hungarian-American investor George Soros attends a press conference prior to the launch event for the European Roma Institute for Arts and Culture at the Foreign Ministry in Berlin, Germany. Soros said oppression of the opposition by Prime Minister Viktor Orban's government is greater than when Hungary was under Soviet domination. He said in a video message that if Orban expels the Soros-founded Central European University, he will keep it in exile and return after Orban's departure. (AP Photo/Ferdinand Ostrop, file)

The hard life of George Soros

Life can be almost good anywhere if you're a billionaire. George Soros, the Hungarian-born billionaire who once shorted the British pound to bring down a conservative government in Britain, has been on a rant that the government in his native Hungary has grown so oppressive that life there is more miserable than it was during the occupation by the Soviet Union, which was the ultimate socialist experiment. Mr. Soros probably thinks life in modern Hungary, with free speech and free elections that don't always go the Soros way, is as oppressive as Donald Trump's America.

Amendment rewrite harmful

Bill of Rights Day is this Friday, Dec. 15. It reminds one how far this country has departed from first principles. The 2015 gay marriage ruling complete a rewrite of the First Amendment, which used to say and mean, "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press ... " We are familiar with the word "expression," and it seems an innocuous expansion. However, "expression" enables a nearly unbounded multi-billion-dollar pornography industry.

Gillibrand not credible

On matters of anything sexual, New York Democratic Sen. Kristen Gillibrand simply has zero credibility ("Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand calls on Trump to resign after sexual harassment claims," Web, Dec. 11). In calling for Trump's resignation, Gillibrand is obviously counting on everybody having completely forgotten about the greatest of the multiple campus rape hoaxes: the Columbia University "mattress girl" hoax. Gillibrand was a key figure in promoting this hoax both nationally and internationally. In fact, in 2015 she even invited the "mattress girl" as her personal guest to former President Obama's State of Union address, where she got a shoutout.

The road to libertarianism

It's become fashionable for conservatives to associate themselves with libertarianism. While these two groups share some similarities with respect to small government, low taxes and more personal liberties and freedoms, how accurate is it?