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A number of factors are contributing to climbing prices at the pump. (Associated Press/File)

Trump’s market-based energy policy opens gates to production, innovation

9 minutes ago

Gas station signs are showing some discouragingly high numbers these days, with gas prices nationally now averaging $2.84 a gallon — up 40 cents from a year ago and the highest mark since 2014. Meanwhile, U.S. producers are pumping out more crude oil than they have in nearly 50 years. What gives?

What Obama and his political Choom Gang did is far worse than Watergate

- The Washington Times

At the end of all the scandal and drama, all of the breathlessly reported lies and false accusations, at the end of all the money wasted on some zany kabuki swamp dance choreographed to the thrumming of giant bullfrogs and yipping of excited coyotes — at the end of all of this — it comes down to precisely what we said it was a year and a half ago.

Illustration on voicing the interests of American aviation workers by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A voice for the American worker

Presidents are judged by how they stand up for the American people. Whether it is protecting U.S. jobs or safeguarding our industries and our jobs from foreign trade cheating, we expect our presidents to act in the best interests of Americans.

Bad Trade Deals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s foreign policy is sound, but the economy gets shorted

President Trump recognizes U.S. foreign policy has for too long sacrificed economic interests and the livelihoods of ordinary working Americans for other important goals — spreading democracy, human rights and alliance building. And we are not getting our money’s worth — our allies expect Americans to bear disproportionate shares of the costs and risks to military personnel of dealing with maelstroms created by Russia, terrorists in the Middle East, China in the Pacific and the like.

Illustration on obstacles to the Trump/Kim summit by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Trump-Kim summit meets a hurdle

The prospects of denuclearization talks between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un began to fade this week.

Illustration on solving remaining questions over sound immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring integrity to the immigration system

In 1990, Congress created the investor visa green card program to bring entrepreneurial talent to the United States, create new jobs and infuse new capital into our economy, especially in hard-hit rural and depressed areas. Unfortunately, over the years this program — known as the EB-5 program — has strayed further and further from congressional intent and has been repeatedly tarnished by scandal and political favoritism.

MidEast Pillars Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trump’s productive disruption

In the same way that candidate Donald Trump disrupted establishment politics in 2016 when he ran for president and defeated establishment politicians on both sides of the aisle, he has completely upended traditional foreign policy in the United States. Pinstriped Foggy Bottom bureaucrats are still in shock with President Trump’s aggressive and — apparently — effective approach to North Korea’s recalcitrant Kim Jong-un.

In this image posted on a photo sharing website by an Islamic State militant media arm on Monday, May 30, 2016, a military vehicle burns as ISIS fighters battle Iraqi forces and their allies west of Fallujah, Iraq. Iraqi forces battling their way into Fallujah repelled a four-hour attack by the Islamic State group in the city's south on Tuesday, a day after first moving into the southern edges of the militant-held city with the help of U.S.-led coalition airstrikes.(militant photo via AP)

A bombshell breach of security issues

The admonition “do not brag” likely will not be found in any intelligence manual. But strictures on revealing “sources and methods,” as well as common sense, dictate that certain matters are not discussed in public.

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A petition has been launched to persuade veteran actor and political provocateur James Woods to run for California governor this year. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

James Woods faults Dems for school insecurity

- The Washington Times

James Woods, one of the few conservatives in Hollywood, sent out a scathing tweet about Democrats and their blocking of common-sense measures that could secure our nation's public schools from shooting attackers. Like how? Like pressing for gun-free zones, for example.

In this Wednesday, May 16, 2018, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump waves from the White House, in Washington. In a series of tweets Sunday, May 20, 2018, Trump skims over the facts involving the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Donald Trump: 'Drain the Swamp!' And he is

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is poised to officially demand a federal investigation into whether the Department of Justice "infiltrated or surveilled the Trump Campaign for Political Purposes," as he put it. And that means, once again, he is putting his mockers to shame.

A shot from Tampa Bay Lightning center Cedric Paquette gets past Washington Capitals goaltender Braden Holtby for a first-period goal during Game 5 of the NHL hockey Eastern Conference finals Saturday, May 19, 2018, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Jason Behnken)

LOVERRO: Braden Holtby holds key to Capitals' fate

The Capitals can dominate, but are not dominant in the most important moments. The Capitals can play well, but they cannot sustain success. The Capitals are capable of winning, but seem far more comfortable folding. The answer? It's been the same since this round of the playoffs started -- Braden Holtby.

In this May 21, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, holds a bilateral meeting with Qatar's Emir Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al-Thani, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Trump sided with Saudi Arabia and other Arab countries Tuesday in a deepening diplomatic crisis with Qatar, appearing to endorse the accusation that the oil-rich Persian Gulf nation is funding terrorist groups. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Peace in the Middle East

Donald Trump isn't the first man to point out that life in the Middle East is built largely on a mirage of fantasy and resentment. But he is the first man in a long time to do something about it. Moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is simply a long-overdue recognition of the reality that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel, and the Jews aren't going anywhere.

Trump's federal disclosure

"Trump met federal disclosure requirement by reimbursing Cohen for Stormy Daniels payment: Government" (Web, May 16) is generally factual. However, the piece implies that controversy remains about whether the disclosure under the 1978 Ethics In Government Act was timely.

Who wants that award, anyway?

Your 17 May editorial, "A bad week for Democrats," says President Trump is not likely to win the Nobel Peace Prize. That's a no-brainer, because he's even less likely to accept it. He wouldn't want his name sullied by association with the likes of Barack Obama, Jimmy Carter and Yasser Arafat. Knowing this, the Nobel Committee wouldn't embarrass themselves by doing the right thing.

Finding better angels, and becoming better

The United States has a problem. We have devolved into a mostly anti-intellectual country, instead now run by showmen and politicians and talking heads and hucksters who would rather look and talk of themselves on TV or Facebook or look into a camera than talk of freedom, liberty, wisdom, philosophy. Where the great minds went, we don't know.

President Donald Trump listens during a meeting with law enforcement officials on the MS-13 street gang and border security, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump doubles down on MS-13 as 'animals'

- The Washington Times

So President Donald Trump referred to MS-13 murderous gang members as "animals" -- and the left went nuts. Trump, to his great credit, laughed off the criticism and doubled down on his original comments.

A protester carries a sign down the street near a Planned Parenthood health center in the Van Nuys section of Los Angeles on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Several dozen protesters gathered in California's San Fernando Valley demanding the organization be stripped of its federal funding.  (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) ** FILE **

Trump's about to make pro-life camp very happy

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump has a new proposal, and it's one that's going to make his Christian and evangelical base quite happy. He's set his sights on reeling in Planned Parenthood and abortion -- another campaign promise coming true.