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Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Investigation into the Investigation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

More Chronicles of Hillary

The Department of Justice will soon commence an investigation to determine whether there should be an investigation (you read that nonsense correctly) of a scandal involving the Clinton Foundation and a company called Uranium One. It appears that FBI decisions made during the time that Hillary Clinton was being investigated for espionage will also be investigated to see whether there should be an investigation to determine whether she was properly investigated. (Again, you read that nonsense correctly.)

In this Oct. 17, 2017, file photo, Army soldiers hone their long-distance marksmanship skills as they train at Fort Benning in Columbus, Ga. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Filling military quotas with the mentally ill

The Army very quietly announced in August that it will lift a ban on waivers allowing people with a history of mental health issues, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, to join their ranks. Even in normal times this should concern you greatly, let alone when the world appears to be preparing for war.

Illustration on the campaign against glyphosphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forcing taxpayers to fund anti-chemical activism

It’s bad enough when tax-exempt foundations and activist groups use junk science and scare campaigns to promote excessive regulations and set the stage for class action lawsuits against perfectly good products. It’s intolerable when our tax dollars directly finance U.S. and European Union government agencies that do likewise.

Illustration on the criminalization of government agencies by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The criminalization of America’s government agencies

The criminalization of government agencies by the Obama administration was far more extensive than previously realized. The Uranium One deal is a prime example of how key government agencies have been criminalized.

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Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., pauses during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Al Franken's astonishing pardon -- from a feminist, no less

- The Washington Times

Kate Harding, a feminist writer who's penned the book "Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance and Revolution in Trump's America," said that Sen. Al Franken should do penance for his sexual assault -- you know, the one captured in part on camera -- but not resign from political office. Harding's logic? He's a Democrat and his political voice is needed in Washington, D.C., she said. Astonishing.

In this Oct. 26, 2006, file photo, former President Bill Clinton holds up the hand of Kirsten Gillibrand, a Democratic lawyer who was running against three-term Rep. John Sweeney, R-N.Y., at a rally in Albany, N.Y. U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand said, in an interview in The New York Times, that former President Clinton should have resigned over his sexual affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky 20 years ago.  (AP Photo/Jim McKnight, File)

Democrats' depravity laid bare by Bill Clinton

- The Washington Times

With profiles in courage like Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand in powerful positions of authority around here, is it any wonder that men and women of America are living in such respectful bliss and harmony with each other?

In this Nov. 16, 2017, photo, former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a news conference in Birmingham, Ala., with his wife Kayla Moore, right. A sex scandal has relegated Moore's hard-line positions on LGBT issues to the background in Alabama's turbulent Senate race even as religious activists blame the "LGBT mafia" and "homosexualist gay terrorism" for his precarious political plight. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Brian Kilmeade, Fox Radio, on latest Roy Moore allegations: 'I would kick his head in'

- The Washington Times

Here's a bit that's bound to ratchet all the fiery commentary surrounding Roy Moore even more. During discussion with Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma about a woman who alleged Alabama's Moore called her high school to ask her for a date -- at a time when Moore was in his 30s -- Brian Kilmeade, on his Fox News Radio show, went this side of blunt and said: If that were my daughter, I'd kick Moore in the head.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Al Franken's days are numbered

- The Washington Times

Sen. Al Franken, who was just outed on a photograph wearing a big smile and groping the chest of a journalist while she slept, is now facing growing calls -- many, from within his own liberal-minded ranks -- to resign. This, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles Schumer both agreed to put Franken before the ethics committee fires for review. His days are numbered.

Erika Harold

When a Miss America runs for office

- The Washington Times

It was 2014 and the first time attendees at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference or CPAC got a load of former Miss America Erika Harold who was invited to address the attendees as of one of the most promising young conservatives in the country. She is a black female lawyer from Illinois who had in 2003 been chosen Miss America. She had entered the Miss America pageant hoping to win enough money to go to Harvard Law School and did just that.

Zimbabwe opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai speaks to the Associated Press after giving a press conference at his home in Harare, Zimbabwe, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017.  Tsvangirai said President Robert Mugabe must resign and called for a negotiated, inclusive transitional mechanism as well as comprehensive reforms before elections. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Coup in Zimbabwe

"Every great cause begins as a movement," the television philosopher Eric Hoffer once observed (maybe), "becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket." There's some dispute about whether Mr. Hoffer ever actually said it, but there's no dispute that it's an accurate description of what happened to the Zimbabwe of Robert Mugabe.

NBC's Megyn Kelly interviews Juli Briskman, a former government contractor who was fired after she was photographed giving President Trump's motorcade the middle finger. (Image: "Megyn Kelly Today" screenshot)

The 100-grand salute

Salutes to the president can be monetized, and a middle-finger salute to a passing presidential motorcade can sometimes be worth more than a hundred grand. Is this a great country, or what?

U.S. owes much to Washington, Lee

Being the great-great grandson of a Union soldier who gave the last full measure of devotion to preserve the Union in the bloodiest war in American history, I have a vested interest in the actions of the Alexandria Episcopal Church and the critics of Gen. Kelly's remarks about the Civil War.

Honoring St. Francis as the boisterous man he was

Dario Fo, who died in 2016 at the age of 90, was an Italian playwright, actor, director, designer, painter, singer, songwriter and political campaigner for the Italian left. In awarding him the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1997, the Swedish Academy praised Mr. Fo as a writer "who emulates the jesters of the Middle Ages in scourging authority and upholding the dignity of the downtrodden."

Be wary of fed-up Puerto Ricans

An academic and former governor's son, Puerto Rico's current governor, Ricardo Rossello, came into office with zero previous political or business experience. However, he is well-schooled in how things work (or often don't work) on the island. His constituents can't vote in federal elections, but once they step foot in any state of the union, they can vote. Voters of the Caribbean are his best bargaining chip in an otherwise poor hand.

Former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore gets in his car after he speaks at a revival, Tuesday, Nov. 14, 2017, in Jackson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Roy Moore -- for the good of conservatism, it's time to go

- The Washington Times

America affords each and every citizen the right of due process, the presumption of innocence over guilt, the constitutional right to stand before one's accusers and face the courtroom music. And that includes Roy Moore. But for the good of the Republican Party -- for the good of the conservative cause -- it's time he stepped aside and let another fill his shoes. He simply can't be effective any longer.