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Conflict Between Oil Producers in Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perils of Saudi reform

In a dizzying sequence of events, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman took a series of moves that will strengthen his status as heir to the throne and the face of his country’s future. These included a roundup of prominent royals, businessmen, and officials and the arrest of a major international Saudi businessman. At the same time, Saudi defense systems intercepted a missile fired at Riyadh from Yemen, the Lebanese prime minister resigned his post during a visit to Saudi Arabia, and another powerful Saudi prince died in a helicopter crash.

Illustration on new GOP wisdom on taxes by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Stupid Party gets smart

Republicans have long been known as “the stupid party.” They do stupid things, like waiting until mid-November to pass a must-pass tax cut that should have been done by April.

In this July 12, 2017 photo, Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington. The normally sleepy Senate Ethics Committee hasn't had a major case since 2011, but it could be deciding next year on the fate of three senators _ including two facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behavior. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

A nation of moral geldings

Question: If the woman in the photo of Al Franken (where he’s groping her while she sleeps) would have given “consent,” then would this be right and good? If morality is really nothing more than mutual “consent” and Sen. Franken could prove that she said this was okay to do while she lay sleeping, he would have nothing — absolutely nothing — to be “ashamed” of. Right?

Illustration on U.S./Azerbaijan cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Azerbaijan, an American partner

Azerbaijan has long been a partner of the United States. In the 26 years since we gained our independence, Azerbaijan has sought friendly relations with the United States. Formal bilateral relations were established with the sagacious efforts and diligence of the late president of Azerbaijan Heydar Aliyev and his American counterparts: U.S. Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Gropergate! The halls of Congress under siege!

- The Washington Times

When I was a young reporter on a certain newspaper in the South, fresh on a new job, I took a fancy to a sweet and pretty young woman (that’s how we talked in those days) working on what newspapers quaintly called “the Society pages.”

Why Trump should arm Ukraine

President Trump has often expressed his desire to build a better, more positive relationship with Russia. However, as Secretary of State Tillerson has said, improved bilateral relations will not be possible without ending Russia’s aggression against Ukraine.

Illustration on the restoration of the Alamo by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Restoring, reinforcing and remembering the Alamo

As a native Texan, as a veteran, and as Texas land commissioner, it is my solemn duty and my great honor to be the caretaker of the Alamo. Who we are as Texans started there and who we can be as Texans and Americans still lives there.

Illustration of George Papadopoulos by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

The Russian shadow

Thank goodness we live in a country where the people who represent us in Congress have the power to investigate and grill federal officials to root out wrongdoing in our government.

Illustration on Brett McGurk by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Following Obama’s footsteps toward Kurdistan’s destruction

Brett McGurk, an Obama appointee serving under President Trump, is working in order to ensure that the United States continues to follow Barack Obama’s failed Iraq policy even though the U.S. now has a Republican president.

United Nations U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley, right, listens as Organization of American States Secretary General Luis Almargo speaks during a U.N. meeting on human rights concerns in Venezuela, Monday Nov. 13, 2017, at U.N. headquarters. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Nikki Haley quite rightly rocks U.N. boat on Venezuela

- The Washington Times

Human rights matter — that’s the message a resolute U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley just sent the Security Council’s way, reminding that Venezuela, land of the socialists, shouldn’t be allowed to skate on civil abuses. This is why Haley rocks. She’s unafraid to take the high ground on behalf of America, even when world players disapprove.

Illustration on the sexual vulgarization of the American culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the cheap and dirty loses its punch

In the high-tech world of social media, where fake news thrives with the real, we’ve become a nation of voyeurs and eavesdroppers. Consuming the salacious is the guilty pleasure. We see and overhear a broad range of sordid comings and goings, what we used to describe quaintly as “dirty,” in the vocabularies that were once reserved for private conversations between close friends, too embarrassing for general discussion.

Illustration on CFPB by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The ‘Equifax’ threat to small-dollar loan customers

There are many flaws in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) small-dollar loan rule, which will deny millions of Americans access to a vital form of credit. One of the biggest problems, which has become an acute problem lately, is the security of consumers’ personal financial information.

When Republicans promise but don’t deliver

Voters in New Jersey and elsewhere just sent a message to President Trump and congressional Republicans: Deliver or expect to get replaced, and planned tax cuts will hardly be enough.

Illustration on a peace initiative in the form of an international research vessel for the South China Sea               The Washington Times

Using science diplomacy in the South China Sea

Despite White House efforts to deny well-established climate change reports and U.S. withdrawal from the 2015 Paris Climate Accord, most might question the wisdom of laying down a science — led peace-building plan in the contested South China Sea disputes. Yet science may prove to be the linchpin for bringing about cooperation rather than competition not only among the claimant nations in the region but also between Washington and Beijing. While President Trump’s recent offer to Vietnam’s President Tran Dai Quang to mediate the complex and challenging disputes over access to fish stocks, conservation of biodiversity and sovereignty claims caught many observers by surprise, it should not have.

Related Articles

Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch (24) rushes against New England Patriots linebacker David Harris (45) during the second half of an NFL football game Sunday, Nov. 19, 2017, in Mexico City. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Trump rips Marshawn Lynch, U.S. anthem sitter, Mexico anthem stander

- The Washington Times

Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch decided to stand during the playing of the national anthem in the leadup to Sunday's matchup against the New England Patriots, and for that, President Donald Trump sent out a scathing tweet, soundly criticizing him. Oh, did I forget to mention it was Mexico's national anthem that played in the background?

In this file photo dated Tuesday, March 14, 2017, a European flag flies along with a British Union flag, left, outside Europe House, the European Parliament's British offices, in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham, File)

Sex study shows Brit teens going wild

- The Washington Times

A new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found today's British teens are taking a more creative approach to sex than their parents, experimenting with more -- trying out new "trends" in sexual practices. And now experts say schools need to teach all this new sex as normal.

Illustration on the deadly history of socialism/communism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Socialism's predictable outcomes

Despite several horrifying current examples of nations in the grip of socialism, many of America's millennials are happily skipping down the socialist Yellow Brick Road toward an Oz that could never be.

FILE - In this May 14, 2012 file photo, King Salman, left, speaks with his son, now Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman, (MBS), as they wait for Gulf Arab leaders ahead of the opening of Gulf Cooperation Council, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The surprise dismissal and arrest of dozens of ministers, royals, officials and senior military officers by MBS late Saturday, Nov. 4, 2017, is unprecedented in the secretive, 85-year-old kingdom. But so is the by-now virtually certain rise to the throne of a 30-something royal who, in another first, is succeeding his father. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar, File)

Interesting times in Arabia

If hard times can make a monkey eat red pepper, as the ancient saying goes, tough times might require Arab and Jew to join forces to bring home the bacon. (Metaphorically speaking, of course.) The reformation of Islam, which stalled in Spain in the 16th century, might be struggling for renewed purchase in Saudi Arabia.

In this April 4, 2012 photo made available by the University of Goteborg in Sweden, the Swedish research team practices before the operations to transplant wombs at the Sahlgrenska Hospital in Goteborg, Sweden. Nine women in Sweden have successfully received transplanted wombs donated from relatives and will soon try to become pregnant, the doctor in charge of the pioneering project has revealed. “This is a new kind of surgery,” Dr. Mats Brannstrom told The Associated Press. Brannstrom is leading the initiative at the University of Goteborg and will run workshops for other doctors on how to perform womb transplants later this year. “We have no textbook to look at,” he said.  (AP Photo/University of Goteborg, Johan Wingborg)

When two heads are better than one

China is thinking big. The Middle Kingdom has already built a small chain of islands in the South China Sea, fortifying them and bids to make them armed fortresses astride the sea lanes connecting Asia to the world. Leaders have to think big, and China obviously wants to replace the United States as the world's superpower.

Players should thank Trump

What were the UCLA basketball players thinking as they were shoplifting merchandise from Louis Vuitton stores in Hangzhou, China? These three could have each gotten a 10-year sentence in a not-so-nice Chinese prison for their moronic stunt. They should thank their lucky stars President Trump was able to work with Chinese president Xi Jinping to secure custody release.

GOP has chance to reform taxes

Too many Republicans excel at joining with Democrats on killing legislation and other critical issues. The Republicans, with a House and Senate majority, have an unprecedented opportunity to pass good, much-needed tax-reform legislation, with a transition period and provision for prompt revision if significant problems occur.

A Chinese danger that must not be taken lightly

Intelligence analysts and media pundits alike are puzzling whether Xi Jinping, president of China, deserves the recent Economist cover calling him the world's most powerful man.

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., pauses during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on nominations on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Al Franken's astonishing pardon -- from a feminist, no less

- The Washington Times

Kate Harding, a feminist writer who's penned the book "Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance and Revolution in Trump's America," said that Sen. Al Franken should do penance for his sexual assault -- you know, the one captured in part on camera -- but not resign from political office. Harding's logic? He's a Democrat and his political voice is needed in Washington, D.C., she said. Astonishing.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who said President Clinton should have resigned over his sexual affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky 20 years ago, later defended him. "Things have changed today, and I think under those circumstances there should be a very different reaction," she said. (Associated Press/File)

Democrats' depravity laid bare by Bill Clinton

- The Washington Times

With profiles in courage like Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand in powerful positions of authority around here, is it any wonder that men and women of America are living in such respectful bliss and harmony with one another?

In this Nov. 16, 2017, photo, former Alabama Chief Justice and U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a news conference in Birmingham, Ala., with his wife Kayla Moore, right. A sex scandal has relegated Moore's hard-line positions on LGBT issues to the background in Alabama's turbulent Senate race even as religious activists blame the "LGBT mafia" and "homosexualist gay terrorism" for his precarious political plight. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Brian Kilmeade, Fox Radio, on latest Roy Moore allegations: 'I would kick his head in'

- The Washington Times

Here's a bit that's bound to ratchet all the fiery commentary surrounding Roy Moore even more. During discussion with Sen. James Lankford of Oklahoma about a woman who alleged Alabama's Moore called her high school to ask her for a date -- at a time when Moore was in his 30s -- Brian Kilmeade, on his Fox News Radio show, went this side of blunt and said: If that were my daughter, I'd kick Moore in the head.

Al Franken and Leeanne Tweeden

Al Franken's days are numbered

- The Washington Times

Sen. Al Franken, who was just outed on a photograph wearing a big smile and groping the chest of a journalist while she slept, is now facing growing calls -- many, from within his own liberal-minded ranks -- to resign. This, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Charles Schumer both agreed to put Franken before the ethics committee fires for review. His days are numbered.