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Opinion

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller’s fishing pole needs a rest

- The Washington Times

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.”

Rep. Donna Edwards, Maryland Democrat, said the bill passed by the House Wednesday would punish federal employees, and amounts to union-busing.

Donna Edwards has put ambition ahead of principle

- The Washington Times

When Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland retired two years ago, Rep. Donna Edwards gave up her safe Prince George’s County congressional seat to take on her House colleague, Montgomery County’s Chris Van Hollen, in the Democratic primary. Ms. Edwards lost by nearly 13 points, in part because a supportive outside group ran a negative and wildly inaccurate ad in the final weeks of the campaign that backfired on her.

A number of factors are contributing to climbing prices at the pump. (Associated Press/File)

Trump’s market-based energy policy opens gates to production, innovation

Gas station signs are showing some discouragingly high numbers these days, with gas prices nationally now averaging $2.84 a gallon — up 40 cents from a year ago and the highest mark since 2014. Meanwhile, U.S. producers are pumping out more crude oil than they have in nearly 50 years. What gives?

What Obama and his political Choom Gang did is far worse than Watergate

- The Washington Times

At the end of all the scandal and drama, all of the breathlessly reported lies and false accusations, at the end of all the money wasted on some zany kabuki swamp dance choreographed to the thrumming of giant bullfrogs and yipping of excited coyotes — at the end of all of this — it comes down to precisely what we said it was a year and a half ago.

Illustration on Trump's Socratic method by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s Socratic method

While the press likes to portray President Trump as impetuous and impatient with details, when it comes to important decisions, he usually weighs options carefully.

Illustration on Chinese pilfering of U.S. medical R&D by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Negotiating better trade agreements

President Trump is now hot and heavy in the trade negotiations with China, as well as Canada and Mexico in negotiating NAFTA 2.0. We are strong free traders, but we also believe that Mr. Trump’s plans to negotiate better trade agreements that reduce trade barriers abroad are right on the mark. He also has to make sure those deals fully protect U.S. intellectual property, or what is commonly called know-how.

University Goat Petting Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pursuing God, or petting goats

It is finals week at colleges and universities across the nation, and the University of Maine at Orono just announced a brilliant plan: It is providing a herd of goats for students to feed and pet in order to help them — presumably the students, not the goats — get through the stress of final exams.

Protecting the Power Grid Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A secure energy grid starts with copper

It’s not hard to imagine the role that energy plays in our daily lives — in fact it becomes immediately apparent when we experience even a brief power outage in our home or workplace. Quite simply, it stops us in our tracks.

James Comey. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The collusion of lawyers is finally collapsing

- The Washington Times

Colluding, like canoodling, is all the rage. Robert Mueller, like a dog chasing his tail, has been trying for more than a year to find evidence that President Trump colluded with Vladimir Putin and the Russians to cook the 2016 election, which fate, providence, fortune and destiny decreed properly belonged to Hillary Clinton.

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Illustration on congressional Republican spending habits by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Republican fear factor

When President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously said, "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself," he could not have foreseen today's Republican Party.

Growing divide contributes to violence

Once again the nation is subjected to violence in our schools — and once again we hear partisan cries for "gun control" as the solution. No, this is not the solution. The danger is that it clouds recognition of many factors that contribute to increased violence, principally the constant hysterical attacks on our president, which undermines national stability. Youngsters are easily influenced by a hatred-filled atmosphere.

At last, justice for Hillary?

The real investigations concerning Hillary Rodham Clinton and her boss have finally begun ("Trump 'takes charge' of deep state influence," Web, May 20). Stay tuned. The supposed investigation of Russian collusion will be found only to apply to Mrs. Clinton and those high up at the FBI, Justice Department and more. Special Counsel Robert Mueller was only there to postpone the inevitable after the shocking election result.

In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, lights shine inside the U.S. Capitol Building as night falls in Washington. (AP Photo/J. David Ake) ** FILE **

A privilege, not a right

No nation is more confused over who, why and how someone may cross its borders than the "nation of immigrants." America's confusion is largely the work of men and women who would get lost on a highway with no exits. Common sense, an uncommonly precious leadership quality, is the compass that points the way toward an immigration policy based on respect for the law. Common sense, alas, suffers a sharp discount in our present day.

How honored glory came to a soldier known but to God

On a wintry day in October 1921, Army Lt. Arthur E. Dewey knelt on the muddy turf alongside one of the hundreds of crosses in a U.S. military burial ground in Thiaucourt, France.