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When illegals use pilfered Social Security numbers

Last week, a House Ways and Means subcommittee heard testimony from the Social Security Administration acting commissioner about the widespread and ongoing theft of Social Security numbers (SSNs)from the American public. Despite its pervasiveness, the illegal alien side of the problem is rarely raised by the media or in Congress. Illegal immigration in general wasn’t mentioned at all during the May 17 hearing. And when the media does cover it, it’s commonly used as a rallying cry to support mass amnesty — the claim being that “illegal aliens pay into the system” and, therefore, “are as American as you and me.”

Illustration on Russia's history of state breaking by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s love affair with state-breaking

In Russia’s long-term war against the West that includes the infiltration of domestic political systems, blackmail and the indirect influence of elected officials through “ethnic political organizations,” one of its most prized and enduring tactics is its exploitation of ethnoreligious rivalries and fissures within the states along its borders.

This is a sign in a Starbucks located in downtown Pittsburgh on Saturday, March 24, 2018. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Fighting bias with business

Last month’s arrest of two black men at a Philadelphia Starbucks has amplified accusations of a double standard in American society. Along with a financial settlement with the men, Starbucks responded by promising to close its stores for part of May 29 in order to conduct racial-bias training for store employees.

Freedom from Big Government Energy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shining a light on Big Power’s monopoly

You might have missed it amid the never-ending drama in Washington, D.C., but a war over energy production and rates rages in America’s heartland.

Illustration on USDA destruction of research kittens by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending taxpayer-funded kitty cruelty

I am a cat person. Nothing against dogs or dog people. I like dogs, too. Growing up, my family always had both. But no one falls equally into both categories; everyone has a preference.

Satchel Paige. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Mr. Mueller’s fishing pole needs a rest

- The Washington Times

Satchel Paige, the legendary master of the sinking curve ball and famous doctor of philosophy, had a few wise words that Robert Mueller could use just now: “Don’t look back, something might be gaining on you.”

Rep. Donna Edwards, Maryland Democrat, said the bill passed by the House Wednesday would punish federal employees, and amounts to union-busing.

Donna Edwards has put ambition ahead of principle

- The Washington Times

When Sen. Barbara Mikulski of Maryland retired two years ago, Rep. Donna Edwards gave up her safe Prince George’s County congressional seat to take on her House colleague, Montgomery County’s Chris Van Hollen, in the Democratic primary. Ms. Edwards lost by nearly 13 points, in part because a supportive outside group ran a negative and wildly inaccurate ad in the final weeks of the campaign that backfired on her.

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This April 20, 2018, photo shows a dealer conducting a game of roulette at Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City N.J. Figures released by New Jersey gambling regulators on Tuesday May 22, show that Atlantic City's seven casinos saw their gross operating profit decline by nearly 12 percent in the first quarter of 2018, to $123.6 million. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Gambling on sports is a bad bet

Human nature being what it is, it should come as no shock that the next level of approved gambling in America is sports betting. States already have casinos, the lottery and other ways of separating money from the weak for their ravenous and bottomless coffers, so why not allow betting on sports contests?

Illustration on the new royal couple by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The bride who can't save the world

It's not easy being a royal bride in Old Blighty. Even keeping up with what to call everybody, and whom to curtsy to, and whom to expect a curtsy from, requires an immersion course in protocol. We can't even call Meghan Markle by her real name.

Navarro needs rebuke

Political commentator and fake Republican strategist Ana Navarro not only once called President Trump a "man-baby," but in 2016 she tweeted: "Should Donald Trump drop out of the race? Yes. He should drop out of the human race. He is an animal. Apologies to animals."

Fewer lowering the flag

I don't know if I'm sad or angry. Some 20 to 40 years ago when our president ordered the American flag to half-mast, almost all flags were lowered in order to honor those the president was trying to honor. Today we are lucky if half the flags are lowered.

President Donald Trump speaks to the media before boarding the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 23, 2018, en route to a day trip to New York City. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Slinging doubts about Singapore

The Democrats and their allied pundits are licking their chops at the prospect of supping on soup of bones from the collapse of the Singapore summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un. Mr. Trump now rates the prospect of the summit even happening as no better than a toss of a coin.

A flawed book still worth reading

Yascha Mounk is a good writer and a bright Harvard University political scientist. While this sounds impressive, one should bear in mind that politics is not really a science. Instead, it is a bubbling cauldron of individual and group prejudices, loyalties, traditions, sentiments, interests and cultural forces that defies a purely scientific analysis.

Tom Wolfe in the 1980's   Associated Press photo

A luminary of language fades away

On May 14 a star failed to come out. Tom Wolfe passed away that day. With his passing the conservative movement lost its greatest social critic, and America lost one of its greatest novelists. As a writer Tom was his own man. He died as he lived, on his terms, or at least as much on his terms as a man can have it.